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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 113, Issue 1, pp 128–136 | Cite as

Comparative field performance over 3 years and two sites of transgenic wheat lines expressing HMW subunit transgenes

  • Peter R. Shewry
  • Stephen Powers
  • J. Michael Field
  • Roger J. Fido
  • Huw D. Jones
  • Gillian M. Arnold
  • Jevon West
  • Paul A. Lazzeri
  • Pilar Barcelo
  • Francisco Barro
  • Arthur S. Tatham
  • Frank Bekes
  • Barbara Butow
  • Helen Darlington
Original Paper

Abstract

A series of transgenic wheat lines expressing additional high molecular weight (HMW) subunit genes and the corresponding control lines were grown in replicate field trials at two UK sites (Rothamsted Research, approximately 50 km north of London and Long Ashton, near Bristol) over 3 years (1998, 1999, 2000), with successive generations of the transgenic lines (T3, T4, T5) being planted. Four plots from each site were used to determine grain dry weight, grain nitrogen, dough strength (measured as peak resistance by Mixograph analysis) and the expression levels of the endogenous and “added” subunits. Detailed statistical analyses showed that the transgenic and non-transgenic lines did not differ in terms of stability of HMW subunit gene expression or in stability of grain nitrogen, dry weight or dough strength, either between the 3 years or between sites and plots. These results indicate that the transgenic and control lines can be regarded as substantially equivalent in terms of stability of gene expression between generations and environments.

Keywords

Transgenic Line Linear Discriminant Analysis Control Line Endogenous Gene Dough Strength 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Rothamsted Research received grant-aided support from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council of the United Kingdom. Part of this work was supported by a grant to Long Ashton Research Station from Zeneca Ltd (subsequently Syngenta) (1999–2002).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter R. Shewry
    • 1
  • Stephen Powers
    • 1
  • J. Michael Field
    • 2
  • Roger J. Fido
    • 3
  • Huw D. Jones
    • 1
  • Gillian M. Arnold
    • 3
  • Jevon West
    • 1
  • Paul A. Lazzeri
    • 1
    • 5
  • Pilar Barcelo
    • 1
    • 6
  • Francisco Barro
    • 1
    • 7
  • Arthur S. Tatham
    • 3
    • 8
  • Frank Bekes
    • 4
  • Barbara Butow
    • 4
    • 9
  • Helen Darlington
    • 3
  1. 1.Rothamsted ResearchHarpendenUK
  2. 2.Advanta Seeds UK LtdDockingUK
  3. 3.Long Ashton Research StationLong AshtonUK
  4. 4.CSIRO Plant IndustryCanberraAustralia
  5. 5.Oryzon Genomics, Parc Cientific de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  6. 6.Agrasys SLBarcelonaSpain
  7. 7.Instituto de Agricultura Sosterisible, CSICCordobaSpain
  8. 8.Biomedical Sciences, Dstl, Porton DownSalisburyUK
  9. 9.Food Standards Australia New ZealandCanberraAustralia

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