Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 110, Issue 7, pp 1301–1314

Genetic relationships within Brassica rapa as inferred from AFLP fingerprints

  • Jianjun Zhao
  • Xiaowu Wang
  • Bo Deng
  • Ping Lou
  • Jian Wu
  • Rifei Sun
  • Zeyong Xu
  • Jaap Vromans
  • Maarten Koornneef
  • Guusje Bonnema
Original Paper

Abstract

Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were employed to assess the genetic diversity amongst two large collections of Brassica rapa accessions. Collection A consisted of 161 B. rapa accessions representing different morphotypes among the cultivated B. rapa, including traditional and modern cultivars and breeding materials from geographical locations from all over the world and two Brassica napus accessions. Collection B consisted of 96 accessions, representing mainly leafy vegetable types cultivated in China. On the basis of the AFLP data obtained, we constructed phenetic trees using mega 2.1 software. The level of polymorphism was very high, and it was evident that the amount of genetic variation present within the groups was often comparable to the variation between the different cultivar groups. Cluster analysis revealed groups, often with low bootstrap values, which coincided with cultivar groups. The most interesting information revealed by the phenetic trees was that different morphotypes are often more related to other morphotypes from the same region (East Asia vs. Europe) than to similar morphotypes from different regions, suggesting either an independent origin and or a long and separate domestication and breeding history in both regions.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jianjun Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Xiaowu Wang
    • 6
  • Bo Deng
    • 6
  • Ping Lou
    • 6
  • Jian Wu
    • 6
  • Rifei Sun
    • 6
  • Zeyong Xu
    • 5
  • Jaap Vromans
    • 3
  • Maarten Koornneef
    • 1
  • Guusje Bonnema
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of GeneticsWageningen UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Laboratory of Plant PhysiologyWageningen UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Laboratory of Plant BreedingWageningen UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Life Science CollegeHebei Agricultural UniversityBaodingPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.Oil Crop Research InstituteChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesWuhanPeople’s Republic of China
  6. 6.Institute of Vegetables and FlowersChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China

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