Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 111, Issue 1, pp 31–43 | Cite as

Genome-wide analysis of the frequency and distribution of crossovers at male and female meiosis in Sinapis alba L. (white mustard)

  • Matthew N. Nelson
  • John Nixon
  • Derek J. Lydiate
Original Paper

Abstract

We present the first genetic linkage maps of Sinapis alba (white mustard) and a rigorous analysis of sex effects on the frequency and distribution of crossovers at meiosis in this species. Sex-averaged maps representing recombination in two highly heterozygous parents were aligned to give a consensus map consisting of 382 loci defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms and arranged in 12 linkage groups with no unlinked markers. The loci were distributed in a near-random manner across the genome, and there was little evidence of segregation distortion. From these dense maps, a subset of spaced informative markers was used to establish recombination frequencies assayed separately in male and female gametes and derived from two distinct genetic backgrounds. Analyses of 746 gametes indicated that recombination frequencies were greater in male gametes, with the greatest differences near the ends of linkage groups. Genetic background had a lesser effect on recombination frequencies, with no discernible pattern in the distribution of such differences. The possible causes of sex differences in recombination frequency and the implications for plant breeding are discussed.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Dr. Gerhard Rakow and Mr. Todd Olsen for formative discussions and for developing plant materials. The work was supported by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and by the Federal-Provincial AgriFood Innovation Fund. M.N.N. was supported by a John Innes Foundation studentship.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew N. Nelson
    • 1
    • 3
  • John Nixon
    • 2
  • Derek J. Lydiate
    • 2
  1. 1.John Innes CentreNorwichUK
  2. 2.Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Molecular Genetics SectionSaskatoon Research CentreSaskatoonCanada
  3. 3.Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, School of Plant BiologyThe University of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia

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