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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 110, Issue 7, pp 1244–1252 | Cite as

QTL mapping of root traits in a doubled haploid population from a cross between upland and lowland japonica rice in three environments

  • Zichao LiEmail author
  • Ping Mu
  • Chunping Li
  • Hongliang Zhang
  • Zhikang Li
  • Yongming Gao
  • Xiangkun Wang
Original Paper

Abstract

To genetically dissect drought resistance associated with japonica upland rice, we evaluated a doubled haploid (DH) population from a cross between two japonica cultivars for seven root traits under three different growing conditions (upland, lowland and upland in PVC pipe). The traits included basal root thickness (BRT), total root number (RN), maximum root length (MRL), root fresh weight (RFW), root dry weight (RDW), ratio of root fresh weight to shoot fresh weight (RFW/SFW) and ratio of root dry weight to shoot dry weight (RDW/SDW). The BRT was significantly correlated with the index of drought resistance, which was defined as the ratio of yield under the stress of the upland condition to that under the normal lowland condition. A complete genetic linkage map with 165 molecular markers covering 1,535 cM was constructed. Seven additive quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and 15 pairs of epistatic loci for BRT and RN were identified under upland and lowland conditions, and 12 additive QTLs and 17 pairs of epistatic QTLs for BRT, RN, MRL, RFW, RFW/SFW and RDW/SDW were identified under the PVC pipe condition. Four additive QTLs and one pair of epistatic QTLs controlling IDR were also found. These QTLs individually explained up to 25.6% of the phenotypic variance. QTL × environment (Q × E) interactions were detected for all root traits, and the contributions of these interactions ranged from 1.1% to 19.9%. Five co-localized QTLs controlling RFW and RDW, RFW/SFW, RDW/SDW and IDR, BRT and RN, RN, MRL and IDR were found. Four types of QTLs governing BRT and RN were classified by their detection in the upland and lowland conditions. Some common QTLs for root traits across different backgrounds were also revealed. These co-localized QTLs and common QTLs will facilitate marker-assisted selection for root traits in rice breeding programs.

Keywords

Doubled Haploid Doubled Haploid Line Root Trait Root Number Upland Rice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Prof. Zuomin Yang for reading the manuscript. This work was supported by the State Key Basic Research and Development Plan of China (2003CB114301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30250009), the Hi-Tech Research and Development Program of China (2004AA211190 and 2003AA207040).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zichao Li
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ping Mu
    • 1
  • Chunping Li
    • 1
  • Hongliang Zhang
    • 1
  • Zhikang Li
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yongming Gao
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xiangkun Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Lab of Crop Genomics and Genetic Improvement, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing Key Lab of Crop Genetic ImprovementChina Agricultural UniversityBeijingChina
  2. 2.International Rice Research InstituteManilaPhilippines
  3. 3.Institute of Crop SciencesChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesBeijingChina

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