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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 112, Issue 1, pp 41–50 | Cite as

High-resolution mapping and mutation analysis separate the rust resistance genes Sr31, Lr26 and Yr9 on the short arm of rye chromosome 1

  • R. MagoEmail author
  • H. Miah
  • G.J. Lawrence
  • C.R. Wellings
  • W. Spielmeyer
  • H.S. Bariana
  • R.A. McIntosh
  • A.J. Pryor
  • J.G. Ellis
Original Paper

Abstract

The stem, leaf and stripe rust resistance genes Sr31, Lr26 and Yr9, located on the short arm of rye chromosome 1, have been widely used in wheat by means of wheat-rye translocation chromosomes. Previous studies have suggested that these resistance specificities are encoded by either closely-linked genes, or by a single gene capable of recognizing all three rust species. To investigate these issues, two 1BL·1RS wheat lines, one with and one without Sr31, Lr26 and Yr9, were used as parents for a high-resolution F2 mapping family. Thirty-six recombinants were identified between two PCR markers 2.3 cM apart that flanked the resistance locus. In one recombinant, Lr26 was separated from Sr31 and Yr9. Mutation studies recovered mutants that separated all three rust resistance genes. Thus, together, the recombination and mutation studies suggest that Sr31, Lr26 and Yr9 are separate closely-linked genes. An additional 16 DNA markers were mapped in this region. Multiple RFLP markers, identified using part of the barley Mla powdery mildew resistance gene as probe, co-segregated with Sr31 and Yr9. One deletion mutant that had lost Sr31, Lr26 and Yr9 retained all Mla markers, suggesting that the family of genes on 1RS identified by the Mla probe does not contain the Sr31, Lr26 or Yr9 genes. The genetic stocks and DNA markers generated from this study should facilitate the future cloning of Sr31, Lr26 and Yr9.

Keywords

Amplify Fragment Length Polymorphism Leaf Rust Rust Resistance Amplify Fragment Length Polymorphism Marker Rust Resistance Gene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Dr. K.W. Shepherd, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide, Australia for providing the ‘King II’ derivative line. We acknowledge excellent technical assistance provided by Luch Hac, Pat Atkinson, Xiaodi Xia, Kim Newell and Cassie Wesley. This project (CSP0017) is supported by financial assistance from the Grains Research and Development Corporation and was undertaken as part of The Australian Cereal Rust Control Program.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Mago
    • 1
    Email author
  • H. Miah
    • 2
  • G.J. Lawrence
    • 1
  • C.R. Wellings
    • 2
  • W. Spielmeyer
    • 1
  • H.S. Bariana
    • 2
  • R.A. McIntosh
    • 2
  • A.J. Pryor
    • 1
  • J.G. Ellis
    • 1
  1. 1.CSIRO Plant IndustryCanberraAustralia
  2. 2.Plant Breeding Institute CobbittyUniversity of SydneyCamdenAustralia

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