Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 110, Issue 4, pp 649–659 | Cite as

Gene actions of QTLs affecting several agronomic traits resolved in a recombinant inbred rice population and two backcross populations

  • H. W. Mei
  • Z. K. Li
  • Q. Y. Shu
  • L. B. Guo
  • Y. P. Wang
  • X. Q. Yu
  • C. S. Ying
  • L. J. Luo
Original Paper

Abstract

To understand the types of gene action controlling seven quantitative traits in rice, we carried out quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in order to distinguish between the main-effect QTLs (M-QTLs) and digenic epistatic QTLs (E-QTLs) responsible for the trait performance of 254 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from rice varieties Lemont/Teqing and two backcross hybrid (BCF1) populations derived from these RILs. We identified 44 M-QTL and 95 E-QTL pairs in the RI and BCF1 populations as having significant effects on the mean values and mid-parental heterosis of heading date, plant height, flag leaf length, flag leaf width, panicle length, spikelet number and spikelet fertility. The E-QTLs detected collectively explained a larger portion of the total phenotypic variation than the M-QTLs in both the RI and BCF1 populations. In both BCF1 populations, over-dominant (or under-dominant) loci were more important than additive and complete or partially dominant loci for M-QTLs and E-QTL pairs, thereby supporting prior findings that overdominance resulting from epistatic loci are the primary genetic basis of inbreeding depression and heterosis in rice.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. W. Mei
    • 1
    • 2
  • Z. K. Li
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Q. Y. Shu
    • 3
  • L. B. Guo
    • 2
  • Y. P. Wang
    • 2
  • X. Q. Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. S. Ying
    • 2
  • L. J. Luo
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Shanghai Agrobiological Gene CenterShanghaiChina
  2. 2.China National Rice Research InstituteHangzhouChina
  3. 3.Institute of Nuclear Agricultural Sciences, College of Agriculture and BiotechnologyZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina
  4. 4.Plant Breeding, Genetics and Biochemistry DivisionInternational Rice Research InstituteMetro ManilaThe Philippines
  5. 5.Department of Soil and Crop SciencesTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  6. 6.Institute of Crop SciencesChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesBeijingChina

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