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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 108, Issue 6, pp 969–981 | Cite as

Ex-situ conservation of Black poplar in Europe: genetic diversity in nine gene bank collections and their value for nature development

  • V. Storme
  • A. Vanden Broeck
  • B. Ivens
  • D. Halfmaerten
  • J. Van Slycken
  • S. Castiglione
  • F. Grassi
  • T. Fossati
  • J. E. Cottrell
  • H. E. Tabbener
  • F. Lefèvre
  • C. Saintagne
  • S. Fluch
  • V. Krystufek
  • K. Burg
  • S. Bordács
  • A. Borovics
  • K. Gebhardt
  • B. Vornam
  • A. Pohl
  • N. Alba
  • D. Agúndez
  • C. Maestro
  • E. Notivol
  • J. Bovenschen
  • B. C. van Dam
  • J. van der Schoot
  • B. Vosman
  • W. Boerjan
  • M. J. M. Smulders
Original Paper

Abstract

Populus nigra L. is a pioneer tree species of riparian ecosystems that is threatened with extinction because of the loss of its natural habitat. To evaluate the existing genetic diversity of P. nigra within ex-situ collections, we analyzed 675 P. nigra L. accessions from nine European gene banks with three amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and five microsatellite [or simple sequence repeat (SSR)] primer combinations, and 11 isozyme systems. With isozyme analysis, hybrids could be detected, and only 3% were found in the gene bank collection. AFLP and SSR analyses revealed effectively that 26% of the accessions were duplicated and that the level of clonal duplication varied from 0% in the French gene bank collection up to 78% in the Belgian gene bank collection. SSR analysis was preferred because AFLP was technically more demanding and more prone to scoring errors. To assess the genetic diversity, we grouped material from the gene banks according to topography of the location from which the accessions were originally collected (river system or regions separated by mountains). Genetic diversity was expressed in terms of the following parameters: percentage of polymorphic loci, observed and effective number of alleles, and Nei’s expected heterozygosity or gene diversity (for AFLP). Genetic diversity varied from region to region and depended, to some extent, on the marker system used. The most unique alleles were identified in the Danube region (Austria), the Rhône region (France), Italy, the Rijn region (The Netherlands), and the Ebro region (Spain). In general, the diversity was largest in the material collected from the regions in Southern Europe. Dendrograms and principal component analysis resulted in a clustering according to topography. Material from the same river systems, but from different countries, clustered together. The genetic differentiation among the regions (Fst/Gst) was moderate.

Keywords

Amplify Fragment Length Polymorphism Principal Component Analysis Analysis Simple Sequence Repeat Locus Gene Bank Amplify Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study has been carried out with financial support from the specific RTD programme (FAIR-CT97-3386) of the Commission of the European Community. It does not necessarily reflect its views and in no way anticipates the Commission’s future policy in this area.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Storme
    • 1
  • A. Vanden Broeck
    • 2
  • B. Ivens
    • 1
  • D. Halfmaerten
    • 2
  • J. Van Slycken
    • 2
  • S. Castiglione
    • 3
  • F. Grassi
    • 3
  • T. Fossati
    • 3
  • J. E. Cottrell
    • 4
  • H. E. Tabbener
    • 4
  • F. Lefèvre
    • 5
  • C. Saintagne
    • 5
    • 15
  • S. Fluch
    • 6
  • V. Krystufek
    • 6
  • K. Burg
    • 6
  • S. Bordács
    • 7
  • A. Borovics
    • 8
  • K. Gebhardt
    • 9
  • B. Vornam
    • 10
  • A. Pohl
    • 10
  • N. Alba
    • 11
  • D. Agúndez
    • 11
  • C. Maestro
    • 12
  • E. Notivol
    • 12
  • J. Bovenschen
    • 13
  • B. C. van Dam
    • 13
  • J. van der Schoot
    • 14
  • B. Vosman
    • 14
  • W. Boerjan
    • 1
  • M. J. M. Smulders
    • 14
  1. 1.Department of Plant Systems Biology, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB)Ghent UniversityGentBelgium
  2. 2.Instituut voor Bosbouw en WildbeheerGeraardsbergenBelgium
  3. 3.Dipartimento di BiologiaUniversità degli Studi di MilanoMilanItaly
  4. 4.Forest ResearchNorthern Research StationRoslinUK
  5. 5.Unité de Recherches Forestières MéditerranéennesInstitut National de la Recherche AgronomiqueAvignonFrance
  6. 6.Department of BiotechnologyAustrian Research CenterSiebersdorfAustria
  7. 7.Department of ForestryOrszágos Mezőgazdasági Minősítő IntézetBudapestHungary
  8. 8.Department of Forestry and BreedingForest Research InstituteSarvarHungary
  9. 9.Hessian Forest CentreHannover/MuendenGermany
  10. 10.Institute of Forest Genetics and Forest Tree BreedingUniversity of GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  11. 11.Department of Breeding and BiotechnologyCentro de Investigación Forestal-Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agraria y AlimentariaMadridSpain
  12. 12.Unidad de Recursos ForestalesServicio de Investigación Agroalimentaria-Diputación General de AragonZaragozaSpain
  13. 13.Research Institute for the Green WorldWageningen University and Research CentreWageningenThe Netherlands
  14. 14.Plant Research InternationalWageningen UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands
  15. 15.INRAUMR BIOGECO 1202Cestas CédexFrance

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