Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 108, Issue 2, pp 253–260 | Cite as

QTLs for Na+ and K+ uptake of the shoots and roots controlling rice salt tolerance

  • H. X. Lin
  • M. Z. Zhu
  • M. Yano
  • J. P. Gao
  • Z. W. Liang
  • W. A. Su
  • X. H. Hu
  • Z. H. Ren
  • D. Y. Chao
Original Paper

Abstract

An F2 and an equivalent F3 population derived from a cross between a high salt-tolerance indica variety, Nona Bokra, and a susceptible elite japonica variety, Koshihikari, were produced. We performed QTL mapping for physiological traits related to rice salt-tolerance. Three QTLs for survival days of seedlings (SDSs) under salt stress were detected on chromosomes 1, 6 and 7, respectively, and explained 13.9% to 18.0% of the total phenotypic variance. Based on the correlations between SDSs and other physiological traits, it was considered that damage of leaves was attributed to accumulation of Na+ in the shoot by transport of Na+ from the root to the shoot in external high concentration. We found eight QTLs including three for three traits of the shoots, and five for four traits of the roots at five chromosomal regions, controlled complex physiological traits related to rice salt-tolerance under salt stress. Of these QTLs, the two major QTLs with the very large effect, qSNC-7 for shoot Na+ concentration and qSKC-1 for shoot K+ concentration, explained 48.5% and 40.1% of the total phenotypic variance, respectively. The QTLs detected between the shoots and the roots almost did not share the same map locations, suggesting that the genes controlling the transport of Na+ and K+ between the shoots and the roots may be different.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported mainly by a grant from the High Technology Development Program of China (Grant No. 2001AA222111 and 2002AA2Z1003). We thank Drs. Da Luo and Takuji Sasaki for their help.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. X. Lin
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Z. Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Yano
    • 3
  • J. P. Gao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Z. W. Liang
    • 4
  • W. A. Su
    • 2
  • X. H. Hu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Z. H. Ren
    • 2
  • D. Y. Chao
    • 2
  1. 1.SHARF Laboratory, Shanghai Institute of Plant Physiology and EcologyThe Chinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiP.R. China
  2. 2.National Key Laboratory of Plant Molecular Genetics, Shanghai Institute of Plant Physiology and EcologyThe Chinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiP.R. China
  3. 3.Department of Molecular GeneticsNational Institute of Agrobiological SciencesIbarakiJapan
  4. 4.Northeast Institute of Geography and Agricultural EcologyChinese Academy of SciencesChangchunP.R. China

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