Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 107, Issue 7, pp 1169–1173

Genetic mapping of the novel Turnip mosaic virus resistance gene TuRB03 in Brassica napus

  • S. L. Hughes
  • P. J. Hunter
  • A. G. Sharpe
  • M. J. Kearsey
  • D. J. Lydiate
  • J. A. Walsh
Article

Abstract

A new source of resistance to the pathotype 4 isolate of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) CDN 1 has been identified in Brassica napus (oilseed rape). Analysis of segregation of resistance to TuMV isolate CDN 1 in a backcross generation following a cross between a resistant and a susceptible B. napus line showed that the resistance was dominant and monogenic. Molecular markers linked to this dominant resistance were identified using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and microsatellite bulk segregant analysis. Bulks consisted of individuals from a BC1 population with the resistant or the susceptible phenotype following challenge with CDN 1. One AFLP and six microsatellite markers were associated with the resistance locus, named TuRB03, and these mapped to the same region on chromosome N6 as a previously mapped TuMV resistance gene TuRB01. Further testing of TuRB03 with other TuMV isolates showed that it was not effective against all pathotype 4 isolates. It was effective against some, but not all pathotype 3 isolates tested. It provided further resolution of TuMV pathotypes by sub-dividing pathotypes 3 and 4. TuRB03 also provides a new source of resistance for combining with other resistances in our attempts to generate durable resistance to this virus.

Keywords

Brassica napus TuMV resistance Specificity Pathotype Genetic mapping 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. L. Hughes
    • 1
  • P. J. Hunter
    • 1
  • A. G. Sharpe
    • 3
  • M. J. Kearsey
    • 2
  • D. J. Lydiate
    • 3
  • J. A. Walsh
    • 1
  1. 1.Horticulture Research International, Wellesbourne, Warwick, CV35 9EF, UK
  2. 2.University of Birmingham, School of Biosciences, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
  3. 3.Molecular Genetics Section, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon Research Centre, 107 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N OX5, Canada

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