Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 107, Issue 2, pp 340–352

Advanced backcross QTL analysis in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

Article

Abstract.

This paper reports on the first advanced backcross-QTL (quantitative trait locus) project which utilizes spring barley as a model. A BC2F2 population was derived from the initial cross Apex (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare, hereafter abbreviated with Hv) × ISR101-23 (H. v. ssp. spontaneum, hereafter abbreviated with Hsp). Altogether 136 BC2F2 individuals were genotyped with 45 SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers. Subsequently, field data for 136 BC2F2 families were collected for 13 quantitative traits measured in a maximum of six environments. QTLs were detected by means of a two-factorial ANOVA with a significance level of P < 0.01 for a marker main effect and a marker × environment (M × E) interaction, respectively. Among 585 marker × trait combinations tested, 86 putative QTLs were identified. At 64 putative QTLs, the marker main effect and at 27 putative QTLs, the M × E interaction were significant. In five cases, both effects were significant. Among the putative QTLs, 29 (34%) favorable effects were identified from the exotic parent. At these marker loci the homozygous Hsp genotype was associated with an improvement of the trait compared to the homozygous Hv genotype. In one case, the Hsp allele was associated with a yield increase of 7.7% averaged across the six environments tested. A yield QTL in the same chromosomal region was already reported in earlier barley QTL studies.

Keywords.

Molecular breeding Microsatellite/Simple sequence repeat Advanced backcross-quantitative trait locus Introgression Hordeum spontaneum 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Crop Science and Plant Breeding, University of Bonn, Katzenburgweg 5, 53115 Bonn, Germany
  2. 2.KWS, Kleinwanzlebener Saatzucht AG, Grimsehlstr. 31, 37555 Einbeck, Germany

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