Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 105, Issue 2–3, pp 440–448 | Cite as

Improvement of hybrid yield by advanced backcross QTL analysis in elite maize

  •  J. Ho
  •  S. McCouch
  •  M. Smith

Abstract.

We applied an advanced backcross breeding strategy to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of agronomic importance in a cross between two elite inbreds of maize, RD6502 (Mo17-type recurrent parent) and RD3013 (Iodent donor parent). Two hundred and four BC2 families were scored at 106 SSR, 15 AFLP, and 38 Heartbreaker (MITE) loci. BC2 testcrosses (TC) with B73 were phenotyped at six locations in the Midwest and N.Y. We detected four grain yield, six grain moisture, and three plant height QTLs at which the RD3013 allele had a favorable effect (p < 0.05). All four yield QTLs were selected as target introgressions in the development of BC3TC families. As predicted by BC2TC analysis, BC3TC entries containing introgressions at yld3.1 and yld10.1 significantly outperformed non-carrier entries by 11.1% (15.6 bu/A at one location) and 6.7% (7.1 bu/A averaged across two locations), respectively, in replicated Midwestern trials (p < 0.05). Detection of yld10.1 effects in the BC2TC by spatial analysis (i.e., incomplete block, response surface, autoregressive, moving average or autoregressive moving average), but not by conventional single point analysis or interval mapping, indicated the utility of local environmental control for QTL mapping in unreplicated maize progeny. This work demonstrated that the advanced backcross QTL method can be applied to identify and manipulate useful QTLs in heterotic inbreds of elite maize. Genetic gains by this approach can be coupled with the maintenance and selection of favorable epistatic gene complexes by traditional hybrid breeding for maize improvement.

Maize Advanced backcross-QTL analysis Grain yield Spatial analysis Heartbreaker miniature inverted transposable elements 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  •  J. Ho
    • 1
  •  S. McCouch
    • 2
  •  M. Smith
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Genomic Diversity, Cornell University, 157 Biotechnology Bldg, Ithaca, NY 14853-2703, USA
  2. 2.Department of Plant Breeding, 252 Emerson Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1901, USA

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