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Naturwissenschaften

, Volume 101, Issue 6, pp 505–512 | Cite as

A new chasmosaurine from northern Laramidia expands frill disparity in ceratopsid dinosaurs

  • Michael J. Ryan
  • David C. Evans
  • Philip J. Currie
  • Mark A. Loewen
Original Paper

Abstract

A new taxon of chasmosaurine ceratopsid demonstrates unexpected disparity in parietosquamosal frill shape among ceratopsid dinosaurs early in their evolutionary radiation. The new taxon is described based on two apomorphic squamosals collected from approximately time equivalent (approximately 77 million years old) sections of the upper Judith River Formation, Montana, and the lower Dinosaur Park Formation of Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta. It is referred to Chasmosaurinae based on the inferred elongate morphology. The typical chasmosaurine squamosal forms an obtuse triangle in dorsal view that tapers towards the posterolateral corner of the frill. In the dorsal view of the new taxon, the lateral margin of the squamosal is hatchet-shaped with the posterior portion modified into a constricted narrow bar that would have supported the lateral margin of a robust parietal. The new taxon represents the oldest chasmosaurine from Canada, and the first pre-Maastrichtian ceratopsid to have been collected on both sides of the Canada–US border, with a minimum north–south range of 380 km. This squamosal morphology would have given the frill of the new taxon a unique dorsal profile that represents evolutionary experimentation in frill signalling near the origin of chasmosaurine ceratopsids and reinforces biogeographic differences between northern and southern faunal provinces in the Campanian of North America.

Keywords

Chasmosaurinae Mercuriceratops gemini Campanian Judith River Formation Dinosaur Park Formation Laramidia 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The specimen was acquired by the ROM from Triebold Paleontology and prepared by Ian Morrison. UALVP 54559 was discovered by Susan Owen-Kagen on July 1, 2012, collected by SO-K and PJC on July 3, 2012 and subsequently prepared by SO-K. Danielle Dufault drew the line illustrations in Figs. 2 and 4. Clive Coy photographed UALVP 54559. DCE was supported by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant. Reviews by Rob Holmes and two anonymous reviewers improved the manuscript.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Ryan
    • 1
  • David C. Evans
    • 2
    • 3
  • Philip J. Currie
    • 4
  • Mark A. Loewen
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Vertebrate PaleontologyCleveland Museum of Natural HistoryClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Department of Natural HistoryRoyal Ontario MuseumTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Department of Biological Sciences, CW 405 Biological SciencesUniversity of AlbertaAlbertaCanada
  5. 5.Natural History Museum of Utah and Department of Geology and GeophysicsUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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