Naturwissenschaften

, Volume 101, Issue 2, pp 87–94 | Cite as

Shifting wavelengths of ultraweak photon emissions from dying melanoma cells: their chemical enhancement and blocking are predicted by Cosic’s theory of resonant recognition model for macromolecules

  • Blake T. Dotta
  • Nirosha J. Murugan
  • Lukasz M. Karbowski
  • Robert M. Lafrenie
  • Michael A. Persinger
Original Paper

Abstract

During the first 24 h after removal from incubation, melanoma cells in culture displayed reliable increases in emissions of photons of specific wavelengths during discrete portions of this interval. Applications of specific filters revealed marked and protracted increases in infrared (950 nm) photons about 7 h after removal followed 3 h later by marked and protracted increases in near ultraviolet (370 nm) photon emissions. Specific wavelengths within the visible (400 to 800 nm) peaked 12 to 24 h later. Specific activators or inhibitors for specific wavelengths based upon Cosic’s resonant recognition model elicited either enhancement or diminishment of photons at the specific wavelength as predicted. Inhibitors or activators predicted for other wavelengths, even within 10 nm, were less or not effective. There is now evidence for quantitative coupling between the wavelength of photon emissions and intrinsic cellular chemistry. The results are consistent with initial activation of signaling molecules associated with infrared followed about 3 h later by growth and protein-structural factors associated with ultraviolet. The greater-than-expected photon counts compared with raw measures through the various filters, which also function as reflective material to other photons, suggest that photons of different wavelengths might be self-stimulatory and could play a significant role in cell-to-cell communication.

Keywords

Photon emissions Cosic resonant recognition model Melanoma cells Near infrared Near ultraviolet 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Blake T. Dotta
    • 1
  • Nirosha J. Murugan
    • 1
  • Lukasz M. Karbowski
    • 1
  • Robert M. Lafrenie
    • 1
  • Michael A. Persinger
    • 1
  1. 1.Biomolecular Sciences ProgramLaurentian UniversitySudburyCanada

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