Naturwissenschaften

, Volume 97, Issue 10, pp 861–881 | Cite as

Status of cold fusion (2010)

Review

Abstract

The phenomenon called cold fusion has been studied for the last 21 years since its discovery by Profs. Fleischmann and Pons in 1989. The discovery was met with considerable skepticism, but supporting evidence has accumulated, plausible theories have been suggested, and research is continuing in at least eight countries. This paper provides a brief overview of the major discoveries and some of the attempts at an explanation. The evidence supports the claim that a nuclear reaction between deuterons to produce helium can occur in special materials without application of high energy. This reaction is found to produce clean energy at potentially useful levels without the harmful byproducts normally associated with a nuclear process. Various requirements of a model are examined.

Keywords

Cold fusion CMNS LENR Heat production Transmutation Review 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author wishes to thank Jed Rothwell, and Abd ul-Rahman Lomax for their suggestions and corrections. Discussions with Brian Scanlan have been especially helpful in arriving at an understanding of this complex subject.

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© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.KivaLabsSanta FeUSA

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