Early mobilization of patients with non-operative liver and spleen injuries is safe and cost effective

  • Amanda Teichman
  • Dane Scantling
  • Brendan McCracken
  • James Eakins
Original Article
  • 17 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

There is no standard protocol for the management of non-operative liver or spleen injuries (LSI). In 2011, our institution changed the non-operative management (NOM) protocol of LSI from prolonged bed rest (PBR) to early mobilization (EM). We aim to show that EM safely decreases length of stay (LOS), ICU LOS, and cost.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective review in which non-operative LSI patients observed PBR from January 2008 through July 2011 and were mobilized early from August 2011 through December 2014. Endpoints assessed were length of bed rest, hospital LOS, ICU LOS, failure of NOM, cost, angiography/embolization, and mortality.

Results

There were a total of 184 patients with LSI who met study criteria and were not excluded. 77 patients utilized PBR between 2008 and 2011 and 107 followed EM protocol between 2011 and 2014. There was no significant difference in the male to female ratio, age, ISS, anticoagulant use, or MOI. Both groups had similar injury profiles. PBR included 34 liver injuries, 45 splenic injuries and two patients with both. EM included 63 liver injuries, 55 splenic injuries and 11 patients with both (for liver injury p = 0.053, for splenic injury p = 0.37, and for combined p = 0.08). LOS and cost were significantly decreased in the EM cohort. LOS was shortened by 1.07 days (p = 0.005) and cost of hospitalization was reduced by $7077 (p = 0.046). There was no difference in NOM failure, angiography/embolization, or mortality.

Conclusion

EM in non-operative LSI is safe and cost-effective. It results in decreased LOS and cost without increasing failure of NOM, angiography, embolization, or mortality.

Keywords

Complication Spleen Liver Outcome assessment Traumatology 

Notes

Author contributions

Dr. Teichman was involved in idea conception, data collection and analysis, manuscript creation and submission. Dr. Scantling was involved in data analysis, manuscript creation and submission. Dr. McCracken and Dr. Eakins were involved in project conception and manuscript drafting.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Amanda Teichman, Dane Scantling, Brendan McCracken and James Eakins declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical standards

Amanda Teichman, Dane Scantling, Brendan McCracken, and James Eakins report no proprietary or commercial interest in any product mentioned or concept discussed in this article.

Research involving human participants/animals

Research involved human subjects and was of a retrospective nature.

Informed consent

Informed consent was unnecessary for this study as it was a retrospective review and all material was de-identified.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amanda Teichman
    • 1
  • Dane Scantling
    • 1
  • Brendan McCracken
    • 1
  • James Eakins
    • 2
  1. 1.Hahnemann University HospitalDrexel University College of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Atlanticare Regional Medical CenterAtlanticUSA

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