Strahlentherapie und Onkologie

, Volume 188, Issue 10, pp 865–872

Highly cited German research contributions to the fields of radiation oncology, biology, and physics: focus on collaboration and diversity

Review article
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Abstract

Background and purpose

Tight budgets and increasing competition for research funding pose challenges for highly specialized medical disciplines such as radiation oncology. Therefore, a systematic review was performed of successfully completed research that had a high impact on clinical practice. These data might be helpful when preparing new projects.

Methods

Different measures of impact, visibility, and quality of published research are available, each with its own pros and cons. For this study, the article citation rate was chosen (minimum 15 citations per year on average). Highly cited German contributions to the fields of radiation oncology, biology, and physics (published between 1990 and 2010) were identified from the Scopus database.

Results

Between 1990 and 2010, 106 articles published in 44 scientific journals met the citation requirement. The median average of yearly citations was 21 (maximum 167, minimum 15). All articles with ≥ 40 citations per year were published between 2003 and 2009, consistent with the assumption that the citation rate gradually increases for up to 2 years after publication. Most citations per year were recorded for meta-analyses and randomized phase III trials, which typically were performed by collaborative groups.

Conclusion

A large variety of clinical radiotherapy, biology, and physics topics achieved high numbers of citations. However, areas such as quality of life and side effects, palliative radiotherapy, and radiotherapy for nonmalignant disorders were underrepresented. Efforts to increase their visibility might be warranted.

Keywords

Radiotherapy Scientific publishing Citation Research evaluation German research 

Vielzitierte deutsche Forschungsbeiträge auf den Gebieten der Radioonkologie, -biologie und -physik: Fokus auf Zusammenarbeit und Vielfalt

Zusammenfassung

Hintergrund und Ziel

Begrenzte Budgets und zunehmender Wettbewerb um Forschungsmittel stellen eine Herausforderung für hochspezialisierte medizinische Disziplinen wie die Radioonkologie dar. Deshalb wurde eine systematische Analyse erfolgreich durchgeführter Projekte mit hohem Einfluss auf die klinische Praxis durchgeführt. Diese Daten können bei der Vorbereitung neuer Vorhaben hilfreich sein.

Methoden

Es existieren unterschiedliche Möglichkeiten zur Bewertung publizierter Forschung, die alle ihre Vor- und Nachteile haben. Für diese Studie wurde ausgewertet, wie oft Artikel von anderen Publikationen zitiert wurden (ein minimaler Durchschnitt von 15 Zitaten pro Jahr wurde gefordert). Oft zitierte deutsche Beiträge auf den Gebieten der Radioonkologie, -biologie und -physik, welche zwischen 1990 und 2010 publiziert wurden, wurden in der Datenbank Scopus identifiziert.

Ergebnisse

In diesem Zeitraum erreichten 106 Artikel, die in 44 verschiedenen wissenschaftlichen Zeitschriften erschienen, die geforderte Anzahl an Zitaten. Im Median betrug der Durchschnitt jährlicher Zitate 21 (15–167). Alle Artikel mit mindestens 40 Zitaten pro Jahr wurden zwischen 2003 und 2009 publiziert. Dies deutet darauf hin, dass die Rate an Zitaten innerhalb von 2 Jahren nach Publikation allmählich ansteigt. Die meistzitierten Artikel waren Metaanalysen und randomisierte Phase-III-Studien, die meist in multizentrischer Kooperation durchgeführt wurden.

Schlussfolgerung

Eine Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Themen auf den Gebieten der Radioonkologie, -biologie und -physik wurden in häufig zitierten Artikeln veröffentlicht. Allerdings waren die Themen Lebensqualität, Nebenwirkungen, palliative Strahlentherapie und Strahlentherapie nichtmaligner Erkrankungen unterrepräsentiert. Es sollten Anstrengungen unternommen werden, um diese Themen besser hervorzuheben.

Schlüsselwörter

Strahlentherapie Wissenschaftliche Publikationen Zitat Forschungsevaluierung Deutsche Forschungsbeiträge 

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Copyright information

© Urban & Vogel 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Oncology and Palliative MedicineNordland HospitalBodøNorway
  2. 2.Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health SciencesUniversity of TromsøTromsøNorway

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