Chemoecology

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 23–28 | Cite as

Agriotes proximus and A. lineatus (Coleoptera: Elateridae): a comparative study on the pheromone composition and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene sequence

  • József Vuts
  • Till Tolasch
  • Lorenzo Furlan
  • Éva Bálintné Csonka
  • Tamás Felföldi
  • Károly Márialigeti
  • Teodora B. Toshova
  • Mitko Subchev
  • Amália Xavier
  • Miklós Tóth
Research Paper

Abstract

The presence of geranyl octanoate, previously found in pheromone gland extracts of Agriotes lineatus females, was also demonstrated in gland extracts of A. proximus females. Similar to A. lineatus, geranyl butanoate was present only in trace amounts in A. proximus female gland extracts. In air entrainment samples of female A. lineatus and A. proximus beetles, the relative ratio of geranyl butanoate and geranyl octanoate was higher than that in gland extracts. In addition, comparison of a segment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene of feral specimens of A. lineatus and A. proximus showed >99% similarity. Both pheromone profile and nucleotide sequence analysis delineate close relationship between the investigated taxa and postulate taxonomic revision. Further studies on sympatric populations of A. lineatus and A. proximus are underway to investigate and better understand possible processes of species diversification.

Keywords

Pheromone extraction Chemical communication Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I Agriotes spp. Geranyl butanoate Geranyl octanoate 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by grant DO02-244/2008 of the Bulgarian National Scientific Fund and by OTKA grant K 81494 of HAS. Comments by anonymous referees and the editors greatly improved the relevance of the work presented.

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Copyright information

© Springer Basel AG 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • József Vuts
    • 1
  • Till Tolasch
    • 2
  • Lorenzo Furlan
    • 3
  • Éva Bálintné Csonka
    • 1
  • Tamás Felföldi
    • 4
  • Károly Márialigeti
    • 4
  • Teodora B. Toshova
    • 5
  • Mitko Subchev
    • 5
  • Amália Xavier
    • 6
  • Miklós Tóth
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyPlant Protection Institute HASBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Department of ZoologyUniversity of HohenheimStuttgartGermany
  3. 3.Veneto AgricolturaLegnaro (Pd)Italy
  4. 4.Department of MicrobiologyEötvös Loránd UniversityBudapestHungary
  5. 5.Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem ResearchSofiaBulgaria
  6. 6.DRAEDMPortoPortugal

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