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Medicinal Chemistry Research

, Volume 26, Issue 11, pp 2900–2908 | Cite as

Isolation of three new metabolites and intervention of diazomethane led to separation of compound 1 & 2 from an endophytic fungus, Cryptosporiopsis sp. depicting cytotoxic activity

  • Sunil Kumar
  • Yedukondalu Nalli
  • Masroor Qadri
  • Syed Riyaz-Ul-Hassan
  • Naresh K. Satti
  • Vivek Gupta
  • Shashi Bhushan
  • Asif Ali
Original Research
  • 158 Downloads

Abstract

The discovery of three new natural products (1, 4, and 5), one semi-synthetic derivative (3) along with two known compounds (2 and 6) were isolated from an endophytic fungus Cryptosporiopsis sp. The structural elucidations of 16 were authenticated by one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. Herein, we intervention of diazomethane as tool that help in the crystallization and isolation of inseparable mixtures of compounds 1 and 2. Compounds (16) were screened for cytotoxic activity against six cancer cell lines in which the 4-epi-ethisolide (2) exhibited moderate activity with IC50 values 11 µM in HL-60, whereas the compound 3 lost its cytotoxic potentiality, but it displayed moderate antimicrobial activity. The result illustrates that the methylene moiety in 2 plays significant role in cytotoxic potential.

Keywords

Endophytic fungus Cryptosporiopsis sp. Cytotoxicity Chemical engineering 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to the CSIR-New Delhi for providing financial support (project no. P81101) for the work of SK. He also acknowledges the AcSIR for their enrolment in Ph. D program. We acknowledge to D. Singh for running and processing NMR experiments. We kindly acknowledge Department of Science & Technology for single crystal X-ray diffractometer as a National Facility under Project No. SR/S2/CMP-47/2003. The manuscript bears the institutional publication no. IIIM/1777/2015.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Supplementary material

44_2017_1989_MOESM1_ESM.docx (3.9 mb)
Supplementary Information

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sunil Kumar
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yedukondalu Nalli
    • 1
    • 2
  • Masroor Qadri
    • 2
    • 3
  • Syed Riyaz-Ul-Hassan
    • 2
    • 3
  • Naresh K. Satti
    • 1
  • Vivek Gupta
    • 4
  • Shashi Bhushan
    • 5
  • Asif Ali
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Natural Product Chemistry DivisionCSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative MedicineJammu- TawiIndia
  2. 2.Academy of Scientific and Innovative ResearchCSIR-Indian Institute of MedicineJammu-TawiIndia
  3. 3.Microbial Biotechnology DivisionCSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative MedicineJammu-TawiIndia
  4. 4.Post-Graduate Department of Physics & ElectronicsUniversity of JammuJammu TawiIndia
  5. 5.Pharmacology DivisionCSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative MedicineJammuIndia

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