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Medicinal Chemistry Research

, Volume 23, Issue 11, pp 4907–4914 | Cite as

Chromenone and quinolinone derivatives as potent antioxidant agents

  • Praveen Vats
  • Vera Hadjimitova
  • Krassimira Yoncheva
  • Abha Kathuria
  • Antara Sharma
  • Karam Chand
  • Arul J. Duraisamy
  • Alpesh K. Sharma
  • Atul K. Sharma
  • Luciano Saso
  • Sunil K. Sharma
Original Research

Abstract

The antioxidant activity (AOA) of three different classes of phenolic compounds viz chromen-2-ones, chromen-4-ones, and quinolin-2-ones was systematically studied using DPPH, ABTS, FRAP, and in vitro lipid peroxidation inhibition assays. The effect of incorporation of hydrophobic group on AOA was also studied. In DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP assays, the highest AOA was registered for the dihydroxy chromenones among all the phenolic derivatives. Presence of alkyl group led to reduction in AOA in the above three assays. However, in lipid peroxidation inhibition assay for selected compounds, incorporation of alkyl group led to enhancement in AOA. The AOA of few compounds was observed to be more than three times higher in comparison to standard “Trolox” in lipid peroxidation inhibitory assay.

Keywords

Antioxidant activity Chromen-2-ones Chromen-4-ones Quinolin-2-ones Lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank University of Delhi, Defence Research Development Organization (DRDO, India), Indo-German Science and Technology Center (IGSTC), and Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) for financial support. The award of Junior/Senior Research Fellowships (JRF/SRF) by CSIR (to KC), University Grants Commission (to AKS at Delhi University) and by DRDO (to DAJ) is gratefully acknowledged.

Supplementary material

44_2014_1054_MOESM1_ESM.doc (109 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 109 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Praveen Vats
    • 1
  • Vera Hadjimitova
    • 2
  • Krassimira Yoncheva
    • 3
  • Abha Kathuria
    • 4
  • Antara Sharma
    • 5
  • Karam Chand
    • 4
  • Arul J. Duraisamy
    • 1
  • Alpesh K. Sharma
    • 1
  • Atul K. Sharma
    • 4
  • Luciano Saso
    • 6
  • Sunil K. Sharma
    • 4
  1. 1.Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied SciencesDelhiIndia
  2. 2.Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Medical FacultyMedical University of SofiaSofiaBulgaria
  3. 3.Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of PharmacyMedical University of SofiaSofiaBulgaria
  4. 4.Department of ChemistryUniversity of DelhiDelhiIndia
  5. 5.Kirori Mal CollegeUniversity of DelhiDelhiIndia
  6. 6.Department of Physiology and Pharmacology “Vittorio Erspamer”Sapienza University of RomeRomeItaly

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