Medicinal Chemistry Research

, Volume 23, Issue 5, pp 2212–2217 | Cite as

Synthesis of halogenated derivatives of thymol and their antimicrobial activities

  • Ranjeet Kaur
  • Mahendra P. Darokar
  • Sunil Kumar Chattopadhyay
  • Vinay Krishna
  • Ateeque Ahmad
Original Research

Abstract

In order to test the antibacterial and antifungal activities of different halogenated thymol derivatives, thymol has been converted into chlorothymol, dichlorothymol with N-chlorosuccinimide; monobromothymol, dibromothymol with N-bromosuccinimide; O-methylated iodothymol with ceric ammonium nitrate and iodine from methylated thymol. Among the different derivatives tested, 4-chlorothymol was found to be most active against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcusepidermis at a concentration of 12.5 and 25 ppm, respectively. Also it was tested to be active against Candida albicans (AI).

Keywords

Thymol derivatives N-Halosuccinimide Antibacterial activity Antifungal activity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ranjeet Kaur
    • 1
  • Mahendra P. Darokar
    • 2
  • Sunil Kumar Chattopadhyay
    • 1
  • Vinay Krishna
    • 2
  • Ateeque Ahmad
    • 1
  1. 1.Process Chemistry and Chemical Engineering DepartmentCentral Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CSIR)LucknowIndia
  2. 2.Genetic Resource Biotechnology DepartmentCentral Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CSIR)LucknowIndia

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