Medicinal Chemistry Research

, Volume 22, Issue 8, pp 4030–4038 | Cite as

In vitro cytotoxicity, antimicrobial, and metal-chelating activity of triterpene saponins from tea seed grown in Kangra valley, India

  • Robin Joshi
  • Swati Sood
  • Poonam Dogra
  • Madhvi Mahendru
  • Dharmesh Kumar
  • Shalika Bhangalia
  • Harish Chandra Pal
  • Neeraj Kumar
  • Shashi Bhushan
  • Arvind Gulati
  • Ajit Kumar Saxena
  • Ashu Gulati
Original Research

Abstract

This study was undertaken to isolate and characterize saponins from seeds of Camellia sinensis. Four triterpene saponins S1, S2, S3, and S4 were isolated by chromatography on silica (60–120 mesh), followed by purification on Sep-Pak C-18 columns. The chemical structures (S1S4) were elucidated on the basis of 1-D and 2-D NMR. All the saponins show broad-spectrum antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Issatchenkia orientalis, Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, A. ochraceous, A. parasiticus, A. sydowii, and Trichophytonrubrum. The most susceptible test fungus was T. rubrum inhibited at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 31.25 μg/ml by all the four saponins. Cytotoxicity of these saponins was evaluated by methyl thiazole tetrazolium and sulfo-rhodamine B assays. The saponins when tested against five human cancer cells lines, viz., OVCAR-5 (ovarian carcinoma cells), MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma cells), PC-3 (human prostate cancer cells), Colo-205 (colorectal adenocarcinoma cells), and HL-60 (human promyelocytic leukemia cells) showed high cytotoxicity activity (99 %) by S1 and S2 on PC-3 cells at concentration of 100 μg/ml. Similarly, when these saponins were tested against human PBMCs by lymphocytes proliferation assay, none showed significant activity. S3 (IC50 = 1.72 mg/ml) showed high metal-chelating activity at a concentration of 20 mg/ml.

Keywords

Camellia sinensis Seeds Triterpene saponins Antifungal activity Cytotoxicity Metal chelating activity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin Joshi
    • 1
  • Swati Sood
    • 1
  • Poonam Dogra
    • 1
  • Madhvi Mahendru
    • 1
  • Dharmesh Kumar
    • 1
  • Shalika Bhangalia
    • 1
  • Harish Chandra Pal
    • 2
  • Neeraj Kumar
    • 1
  • Shashi Bhushan
    • 1
  • Arvind Gulati
    • 1
  • Ajit Kumar Saxena
    • 2
  • Ashu Gulati
    • 1
  1. 1.CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource TechnologyPalampurIndia
  2. 2.CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative MedicineJammuIndia

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