International Journal of Public Health

, Volume 59, Issue 2, pp 279–288

The longitudinal association between weight change and health-related quality of life: the KORA S4/F4 cohort study

  • Michael Laxy
  • Rolf Holle
  • Angela Döring
  • Annette Peters
  • Matthias Hunger
Original Article

Abstract

Objectives

Despite the increasing importance of patient-centered perspectives, the impact of weight change on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) has remained unclear. This work aims to investigate this longitudinal relationship.

Methods

Data was collected from a population-based cohort study of 3,080 Germans. Anthropometrics and HRQL were assessed at baseline and after a 7-year follow-up period. Using linear regression the average change in HRQL scores was calculated among 5 mutually exclusive weight change groups. Multilevel growth modeling was conducted to differentiate between interpersonal (cross-sectional) and intrapersonal (longitudinal) associations between body mass index (BMI)/BMI change and HRQL.

Results

Heavy weight gain (≥10 % body weight) was associated with impairments in physical health among women (−2.82 points, CI: −4.29, −1.34) and obese men (−4.33 points, CI: −7.62, −1.04) and with improvements in mental health among women (+3.20 points, CI: +1.37, +5.02). Results from the multilevel models were consistent, showing negative associations between BMI change and physical health, positive associations between BMI change and mental health and a high degree of similarity between interpersonal and intrapersonal associations.

Conclusions

Weight gain leads to clinically relevant impairments in physical health. More research is needed to clarify the antipodal effects of weight change on physical and mental health components.

Keywords

Health-related quality of life Weight change Obesity Longitudinal Population-based 

Supplementary material

38_2013_506_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (85 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 85 kb)

Copyright information

© Swiss School of Public Health 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Laxy
    • 1
  • Rolf Holle
    • 1
  • Angela Döring
    • 2
  • Annette Peters
    • 2
  • Matthias Hunger
    • 1
  1. 1.Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental HealthInstitute of Health Economics and Health Care ManagementNeuherbergGermany
  2. 2.Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental HealthInstitute of Epidemiology IINeuherbergGermany

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