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International Journal of Public Health

, Volume 53, Issue 4, pp 180–187 | Cite as

Association between acculturation and childhood vaccination coverage in migrant populations: a population based study from a rural region in Bavaria, Germany

  • Rafael T. MikolajczykEmail author
  • Manas K Akmatov
  • Heribert Stich
  • Alexander Krämer
  • Mirjam Kretzschmar
Original Article

Summary

Objectives:

The aim of our analysis was to investigate the association between acculturation and the vaccination coverage among pre-school children.

Methods:

We performed a study of vaccination status for measles-mumps-rubella and hepatitis B among pre-school children, during mandatory school entry examinations, in a district of Bavaria, Germany, in 2004 and 2005 (N = 2,043). Prior to the examinations, parents were asked to fill out a self-administered questionnaire assessing socio-demographic information, including variables related to migration background (response rate 73 %, N = 1,481). We used Categorical Principal Component Analysis (CATPCA) to create an acculturation index and assessed the association between the acculturation and vaccination status for both vaccines.

Results:

We found no difference in vaccination status with the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine in relation to acculturation. The coverage with at least three doses of hepatitis B vaccine was similar among migrants and in the indigenous population, but the risk of incomplete (1 or 2 doses) versus full vaccination was higher (OR = 2.74, 95%CI 1.34–5.61) and the risk of lacking vaccination lower (OR = 0.30, 95%CI 0.12–0.77) among less acculturated migrants compared to the indigenous population.

Conclusions:

For multi-dose vaccines lower acculturation was associated with incomplete vaccination, but the partial protection in this group was higher compared to indigenous population.

Keywords:

CATPCA Vaccination Migration Acculturation Germany 

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Copyright information

© Birkhaeuser 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rafael T. Mikolajczyk
    • 1
    Email author
  • Manas K Akmatov
    • 1
  • Heribert Stich
    • 2
  • Alexander Krämer
    • 1
  • Mirjam Kretzschmar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Public Health Medicine, School of Public HealthUniversity of BielefeldBielefeldGermany
  2. 2.Department of Public HealthDistrict of Dingolfing-LandauDingolfingGermany

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