Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences

, Volume 69, Issue 15, pp 2593–2608 | Cite as

Mesenchymal stem cells and neural crest stem cells from adult bone marrow: characterization of their surprising similarities and differences

  • Sabine Wislet-Gendebien
  • Emerence Laudet
  • Virginie Neirinckx
  • Philippe Alix
  • Pierre Leprince
  • Aneta Glejzer
  • Christophe Poulet
  • Benoit Hennuy
  • Lukas Sommer
  • Olga Shakhova
  • Bernard Rogister
Research Article

Abstract

The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crest stem cells (NCSC) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), including their similarities and differences. In this paper, using transcriptomic as well as proteomic technologies, we compared NCSC to MSC and stromal nestin-positive cells, all of them isolated from adult bone marrow. We demonstrated that the nestin-positive cell population, which was the first to be described as able to differentiate into functional neurons, was a mixed population of NCSC and MSC. More interestingly, we demonstrated that MSC shared with NCSC the same ability to truly differentiate into Tuj1-positive cells when co-cultivated with paraformaldehyde-fixed cerebellar granule neurons. Altogether, those results suggest that both NCSC and MSC can be considered as important tools for cellular therapies in order to replace neurons in various neurological diseases.

Keywords

Neural crest stem cells Mesenchymal stem cells Adult bone marrow Cell fate Microarray 

Supplementary material

18_2012_937_MOESM1_ESM.tif (2.9 mb)
Figure S1. Regulated genes between nestin (+) and nestin (-) BMSC: cell fate. Genes expressed by nestin (+) and nestin (-) BMSC have been classified according to their relevance to cell types: stem cells, neural cells, mesenchymal cells, hematopoietic cells, endothelial cells. IPA software was used for classification and gene expression profile analyses. Supplementary material 1 (TIFF 2931 kb)
18_2012_937_MOESM2_ESM.tif (2.9 mb)
Figure S2. Regulated genes between nestin (+) and nestin (-) BMSC: Signaling pathways. Genes expressed by nestin (+) and nestin (-) BMSC have been classified according to their relevance to signaling pathways. IPA software was used for classification and gene expression profile analyses. Supplementary material 2 (TIFF 2931 kb)
18_2012_937_MOESM3_ESM.tif (2.9 mb)
Figure S3. Regulated genes between NCSC and MSC clones: cell fate. Genes expressed by NCSC and MSC have been classified according to their relevance to cell types: stem cells, neural cells, mesenchymal cells, hematopoietic cells, endothelial cells. IPA software was used for classification and gene expression profile analyses. Supplementary material 3 (TIFF 2931 kb)
18_2012_937_MOESM4_ESM.tif (2.9 mb)
Figure S4. Regulated genes between NCSC and MSC clones: Signaling pathways. Genes expressed by NCSC and MSC have been classified according to their relevance to signaling pathways. IPA software was used for classification and gene expression profile analyses. Supplementary material 4 (TIFF 2931 kb)
18_2012_937_MOESM5_ESM.pdf (94 kb)
Table S1. List of regulated genes in nestin (+) BMSC compared to nestin (-) BMSC. 379 genes have been identified as differentially expressed between nestin (+) and nestin (-) BMSC, with a minimum of twofold difference. Supplementary material 5 (PDF 93 kb)
18_2012_937_MOESM6_ESM.xls (24 kb)
Supplementary material 6 (XLS 23 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Basel AG 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sabine Wislet-Gendebien
    • 1
  • Emerence Laudet
    • 1
  • Virginie Neirinckx
    • 1
  • Philippe Alix
    • 1
  • Pierre Leprince
    • 1
  • Aneta Glejzer
    • 1
  • Christophe Poulet
    • 2
  • Benoit Hennuy
    • 6
  • Lukas Sommer
    • 3
  • Olga Shakhova
    • 3
  • Bernard Rogister
    • 1
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.GIGA NeurosciencesUniversity of LiegeLiègeBelgium
  2. 2.GIGA ResearchUniversity of LiegeLiègeBelgium
  3. 3.Institute of AnatomyUniversity of ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  4. 4.GIGA Development, Stem Cells and Regenerative MedicineUniversity of LiègeLiègeBelgium
  5. 5.Department of NeurologyCHU LiègeLiègeBelgium
  6. 6.GIGA Genomics PlatformUniversity of LiegeLiègeBelgium

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