Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences

, Volume 69, Issue 12, pp 1997–2008

The battle against immunopathology: infectious tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells

Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00018-011-0907-z

Cite this article as:
Gravano, D.M. & Vignali, D.A.A. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. (2012) 69: 1997. doi:10.1007/s00018-011-0907-z

Abstract

Infectious tolerance is a process whereby one regulatory lymphoid population confers suppressive capacity on another. Diverse immune responses are induced following infection or inflammatory insult that can protect the host, or potentially cause damage if not properly controlled. Thus, the process of infectious tolerance may be critical in vivo for exerting effective immune control and maintaining immune homeostasis by generating specialized regulatory sub-populations with distinct mechanistic capabilities. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a central mediator of infectious tolerance through their ability to convert conventional T cells into induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) directly by secretion of the suppressive cytokines TGF-β, IL-10, or IL-35, or indirectly via dendritic cells. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms and cell populations that mediate and contribute to infectious tolerance, with a focus on the intestinal environment, where tolerance induction to foreign material is critical.

Keywords

Infectious tolerance Regulatory T cell Intestine Helminth Microbiota 

Abbreviations

DC

Dendritic cells

EAE

Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

E/S

Excretory/secretory products

IDO

Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

IPEX

Immunodysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked

iTregs

Induced Tregs

PSA

Polysaccharide A

RA

Retinoic acid

SEA

Soluble egg antigen

Tregs

Regulatory T cells

Copyright information

© Springer Basel AG 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ImmunologySt. Jude Children’s Research HospitalMemphisUSA

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