Physics in Perspective

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 443–466

Washington: A DC Circuit Tour

Article
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Abstract

I explore the history of physics in Washington, D.C., and its environs through a tour of notable sites and personalities. Highlights include visits to the Smithsonian and Carnegie Institutions, stops at the Einstein Memorial, George Washington University, the University of Maryland, and the American Center for Physics, and biographical sketches of physicists Joseph Henry, George Gamow, Edward Teller, and others who worked in the District of Columbia.

Keywords

Ralph A. Alpher Louis Agricola Bauer Gregory Breit Stephen G. Brush Steven Chu John Adam Fleming Wendy Freedman George Gamow Sylvester James Gates George Ellery Hale Joseph Henry Robert Herman Edwin Hubble Shirley Ann Jackson Vera C. Rubin Edward Teller John S. Toll Merle Tuve Erskine Williamson Albert Einstein Memorial American Center for Physics American Institute of Physics Carnegie Institution of Washington Department of Terrestrial Magnetism Marion Koshland Science Museum National Academy of Sciences Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Smithsonian Institution U.S. Department of Energy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Basel AG 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mathematics, Physics and StatisticsUniversity of the Sciences in PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA

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