Swiss Journal of Geosciences

, Volume 104, Supplement 1, pp 21–33

A new azhdarchoid pterosaur from the Cenomanian (Late Cretaceous) of Lebanon

Article

Abstract

A new pterosaur, Microtuban altivolans gen. et sp. nov., is described from the Sannine Formation of northern Lebanon. The specimen is the first pterosaur from the Early Cenomanian (Late Cretaceous) locality of Hjoûla and is regarded as the most complete pterosaur fossil discovered from Africa. While postcranial characters indicate a possible relationship with members of the Thalassodromidae or Chaoyangopteridae, the specimen possesses an exceptionally short wing-finger phalanx 4, forming only 1.1% of the total length of the wing-finger. Its appearance along with an unnamed ornithocheiroid from the slightly younger locality of Hâqel suggests that a number of pterosaur taxa existed within the local area, perhaps living on exposed carbonate platforms.

Keywords

Pterosaur Azhdarchoidea Microtuban Cretaceous Lebanon 

Abbreviations

GMN

Geological Museum of Nanjing (China)

HGM

Henan Geological Museum, Zhenzhou (China)

IMCF

Iwaki Coal and Fossil Museum (Japan)

MN

Museu Nacional, Rio de Janerio (Brazil)

SMNK

Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Karlsruhe (Germany)

TMM

Texas Memorial Museum (USA)

ZHNM

Zhejiang Museum of Natural History, Hanzhou (China)

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Copyright information

© Swiss Geological Society 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Karlsruhe, Abteilung GeologieKarlsruheGermany

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