Proinflammatory cytokines and IL-10 in inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer patients

  • Andrzej Szkaradkiewicz
  • Ryszard Marciniak
  • Izabela Chudzicka-Strugała
  • Agnieszka Wasilewska
  • Michał Drews
  • Przemysław Majewski
  • Tomasz Karpiński
  • Barbara Zwoździak
Open Access
Original Article

Abstract

Introduction

The aim of the study was to describe the levels of circulating monocyte/macrophage pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β IL-6, and IL-8) and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and healthy controls.

Materials and Methods

The study was conducted on 15 healthy individuals, 20 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 12 with Crohn’s disease (CD), and 15 with CRC (Dukes’ stage B). Blood serum cytokine levels were measured by ELISA.

Results

The patients with UC had significantly higher levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and of circulating IL-10 than the healthy controls. The patients with CD and CRC had the same specific pattern of serum cytokines of significantly elevated levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, but the IL-10 levels were within the range found in the healthy individuals.

Conclusions

Thus our results demonstrate that both IBD and CRC are linked with an intensified production of a wide array of monocyte/macrophage pro-inflammatory cytokines which is not accompanied by elevated levels of circulating IL-10, except for its insufficiently inhibitory elevation in UC patients.

Keywords

cytokines inflammation Crohn’s disease ulcerative colitis colorectal cancer 

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Copyright information

© L. Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Wroclaw, Poland 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrzej Szkaradkiewicz
    • 1
  • Ryszard Marciniak
    • 2
  • Izabela Chudzicka-Strugała
    • 1
  • Agnieszka Wasilewska
    • 2
  • Michał Drews
    • 2
  • Przemysław Majewski
    • 3
  • Tomasz Karpiński
    • 1
  • Barbara Zwoździak
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical MicrobiologyUniversity of Medical SciencesPoznańPoland
  2. 2.Department of General, Gastroenterological, and Endocrinological SurgeryUniversity of Medical SciencesPoznańPoland
  3. 3.Department of Clinical PathomorphologyUniversity of Medical SciencesPoznańPoland

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