Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 262, Issue 4–5, pp 683–702

Functional analysis of 150 deletion mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a systematic approach

  • K.-D. Entian
  • T. Schuster
  • J. H. Hegemann
  • D. Becher
  • H. Feldmann
  • U. Güldener
  • R. Götz
  • M. Hansen
  • C. P. Hollenberg
  • G. Jansen
  • W. Kramer
  • S. Klein
  • P. Kötter
  • J. Kricke
  • H. Launhardt
  • G. Mannhaupt
  • A. Maierl
  • P. Meyer
  • W. Mewes
  • T. Munder
  • R. K. Niedenthal
  • M. Ramezani Rad
  • A. Röhmer
  • A. Römer
  • M. Rose
  • B. Schäfer
  • M.-L. Siegler
  • J. Vetter
  • N. Wilhelm
  • K. Wolf
  • F. K. Zimmermann
  • A. Zollner
  • A. Hinnen
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

In a systematic approach to the study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes of unknown function, 150 deletion mutants were constructed (1 double, 149 single mutants) and phenotypically analysed. Twenty percent of all genes examined were essential. The viable deletion mutants were subjected to 20 different test systems, ranging from high throughput to highly specific test systems. Phenotypes were obtained for two-thirds of the mutants tested. During the course of this investigation, mutants for 26 of the genes were described by others. For 18 of these the reported data were in accordance with our results. Surprisingly, for seven genes, additional, unexpected phenotypes were found in our tests. This suggests that the type of analysis presented here provides a more complete description of gene function.

Key wordsSaccharomyces cerevisiae Deletion mutants Phenotypic analysis 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • K.-D. Entian
    • 1
  • T. Schuster
    • 2
  • J. H. Hegemann
    • 3
  • D. Becher
    • 5
  • H. Feldmann
    • 6
  • U. Güldener
    • 3
  • R. Götz
    • 10
  • M. Hansen
    • 11
  • C. P. Hollenberg
    • 7
  • G. Jansen
    • 7
  • W. Kramer
    • 8
  • S. Klein
    • 3
  • P. Kötter
    • 1
  • J. Kricke
    • 5
  • H. Launhardt
    • 4
  • G. Mannhaupt
    • 6
  • A. Maierl
    • 9
  • P. Meyer
    • 8
  • W. Mewes
    • 9
  • T. Munder
    • 4
  • R. K. Niedenthal
    • 3
  • M. Ramezani Rad
    • 7
  • A. Röhmer
    • 1
  • A. Römer
    • 8
  • M. Rose
    • 1
  • B. Schäfer
    • 11
  • M.-L. Siegler
    • 2
  • J. Vetter
    • 6
  • N. Wilhelm
    • 10
  • K. Wolf
    • 11
  • F. K. Zimmermann
    • 10
  • A. Zollner
    • 9
  • A. Hinnen
    • 4
  1. 1.Institut für Mikrobiologie, Universität Frankfurt, Marie-Curie-Str. 9, D-60439 Frankfurt/Main, Germany e-mail: Entian@em.uni-frankfurt.deDE
  2. 2.Institut für Medizinische Strahlenkunde und Zellforschung (MSZ), Universität Würzburg, Verbacher Str. 5, D-97078 Würzburg, GermanyDE
  3. 3.Institut für Mikrobiologie, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Universitätsstr. 1, Gebäude 26.12.01, D-40225 Düsseldorf, GermanyDE
  4. 4.Hans-Knöll-Institut für Naturstoff-Forschung e.V., Beutenbergstr. 11, D-07745 Jena, GermanyDE
  5. 5.Institut für Genetik und Biochemie, Universität Greifswald, Jahnstr. 14, D-17486 Greifswald, GermanyDE
  6. 6.Institut für Physiologische Chemie, Physikalische Biochemie und Zellbiologie, Universität München, Schillerstraße 44, D-80336 München, GermanyDE
  7. 7.Institut für Mikrobiologie, Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1, Gebäude 26.12.01, D-40225 Düsseldorf, GermanyDE
  8. 8.Institut für Mikrobiologie und Genetik, Universität Göttingen, Grisebachstr. 8, D-37077 Göttingen, GermanyDE
  9. 9.MIPS am Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie, Am Klopferspitz 18a, D-82152 Martinsried, GermanyDE
  10. 10.Institut für Mikrobiologie, TH Darmstadt, Schnittspahnstr. 10, D-64287 Darmstadt, GermanyDE
  11. 11.Institut für Biologie IV, RWTH Aachen, Worringer Weg, D-52056 Aachen, GermanyDE

Personalised recommendations