International Urogynecology Journal

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 22–28

Dietary Caffeine, Fluid Intake and Urinary Incontinence in Older Rural Women

  • B. U. Tomlinson
  • M. C. Dougherty
  • J. F. Pendergast
  • A. R. Boyington
  • M. A. Coffman
  • S. M. Pickens
Original Article

Abstract:

Forty-one women completed the first phase (self-monitoring) of the Behavioral Management for Continence (BMC) intervention, while working with a nurse during home visits to reduce involuntary urine loss as part of the parent study involving older, rural women living at home. A decrease in dietary caffeine intake and an increase in fluid intake were most frequently recommended. The relationship between a decrease in the amount of dietary caffeine consumed and fewer daytime episodes of involuntary urine loss approached significance –P = 0.0744 – whereas an increase in the average amount of fluid intake was significantly related to an increase in the average volume of urine voided –P = 0.0479 – and not to involuntary urine loss.

Key words:Behavioral management – Caffeine – Fluid intake – Incontinence 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. U. Tomlinson
    • 1
  • M. C. Dougherty
    • 2
  • J. F. Pendergast
    • 3
  • A. R. Boyington
    • 2
  • M. A. Coffman
    • 4
  • S. M. Pickens
    • 5
  1. 1.School of Nursing, Hawaii Pacific University, Honolulu, HIUS
  2. 2.School of Nursing, University of North CarolinaUS
  3. 3.Dept of Biostatistics, University of Florida, GainesvilleUS
  4. 4.Bladder and Pelvic Floor Treatment Center, Orange Park, FLUS
  5. 5.Nurse Corps, Little Rock US Air Force Base, Jacksonville, AR, USAUS

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