Journal of High Energy Physics

, 2013:63

Energy trapping from Hagedorn densities of states

  • Connor Behan
  • Klaus Larjo
  • Nima Lashkari
  • Brian Swingle
  • Mark Van Raamsdonk
Article

DOI: 10.1007/JHEP10(2013)063

Cite this article as:
Behan, C., Larjo, K., Lashkari, N. et al. J. High Energ. Phys. (2013) 2013: 63. doi:10.1007/JHEP10(2013)063
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Abstract

In this note, we construct simple stochastic toy models for holographic gauge theories in which distributions of energy on a collection of sites evolve by a master equation with some specified transition rates. We build in only energy conservation, locality, and the standard thermodynamic requirement that all states with a given energy are equally likely in equilibrium. In these models, we investigate the qualitative behavior of the dynamics of the energy distributions for different choices of the density of states for the individual sites. For typical field theory densities of states (log(ρ(E)) ~ Eα<1), the model gives diffusive behavior in which initially localized distributions of energy spread out relatively quickly. For large N gauge theories with gravitational duals, the density of states for a finite volume of field theory degrees of freedom typically includes a Hagedorn regime (log(ρ(E)) ~ E). We find that this gives rise to a trapping of en! ergy in subsets of degrees of freedom for parametrically long time scales before the energy leaks away. We speculate that this Hagedorn trapping may be part of a holographic explanation for long-lived gravitational bound states (black holes) in gravitational theories.

Keywords

Gauge-gravity correspondence AdS-CFT Correspondence Nonperturbative Effects 

Copyright information

© SISSA, Trieste, Italy 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Connor Behan
    • 1
  • Klaus Larjo
    • 2
  • Nima Lashkari
    • 1
  • Brian Swingle
    • 3
  • Mark Van Raamsdonk
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsBrown UniversityProvidenceU.S.A.
  3. 3.Department of PhysicsHarvard UniversityCambridgeU.S.A.

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