Journal of High Energy Physics

, 2017:121

Strong first order electroweak phase transition in the CP-conserving 2HDM revisited

  • P. Basler
  • M. Krause
  • M. Mühlleitner
  • J. Wittbrodt
  • A. Wlotzka
Open Access
Regular Article - Theoretical Physics

DOI: 10.1007/JHEP02(2017)121

Cite this article as:
Basler, P., Krause, M., Mühlleitner, M. et al. J. High Energ. Phys. (2017) 2017: 121. doi:10.1007/JHEP02(2017)121
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Abstract

The discovery of the Higgs boson by the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS has marked a milestone for particle physics. Yet, there are still many open questions that cannot be answered within the Standard Model (SM). For example, the generation of the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe through baryogenesis can only be explained qualitatively in the SM. A simple extension of the SM compatible with the current theoretical and experimental constraints is given by the 2-Higgs-Doublet Model (2HDM) where a second Higgs doublet is added to the Higgs sector. We investigate the possibility of a strong first order electroweak phase transition in the CP-conserving 2HDM type I and type II where either of the CP-even Higgs bosons is identified with the SM-like Higgs boson. The renormalisation that we apply on the loop-corrected Higgs potential allows us to efficiently scan the 2HDM parameter space and simultaneously take into account all relevant theoretical and up-to-date experimental constraints. The 2HDM parameter regions found to be compatible with the applied constraints and a strong electroweak phase transition are analysed systematically. Our results show that there is a strong interplay between the requirement of a strong phase transition and collider phenomenology with testable implications for searches at the LHC.

Keywords

Beyond Standard Model Higgs Physics 

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Basler
    • 1
  • M. Krause
    • 1
  • M. Mühlleitner
    • 1
  • J. Wittbrodt
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Wlotzka
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of TechnologyKarlsruheGermany
  2. 2.Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESYHamburgGermany

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