Advertisement

Canadian Journal of Public Health

, Volume 95, Issue 5, pp 387–391 | Cite as

Stability of Normative Data for the SF-36

Results of a Three-year Prospective Study in Middle-aged Canadians
  • Wilma M. Hopman
  • Claudie Berger
  • Lawrence Joseph
  • Tanveer Towheed
  • Elizabeth vandenKerkhof
  • Tassos Anastassiades
  • Ann Cranney
  • Jonathan D. Adachi
  • George Ioannidis
  • Suzette Poliquin
  • Jacques P. Brown
  • Timothy M. Murray
  • David A. Hanley
  • Emmanuel A. Papadimitropoulos
  • Alan Tenenhouse
  • Suzette Poliquin
  • Suzanne Godmaire
  • Lawrence Joseph
  • Claudie Berger
  • Carol Joyce
  • Emma Sheppard
  • Susan Kirkland
  • Stephanie Kaiser
  • Barbara Stanfield
  • Jacques P. Brown
  • Evelyne Lejeune
  • Tassos Anastassiades
  • Barbara Matthews
  • Nancy Kreiger
  • Timothy M. Murray
  • Barbara Gardner-Bray
  • Jonathan D. Adachi
  • Laura Pickard
  • Wojciech P. Olszynski
  • Jola Thingvold
  • David A. Hanley
  • Jane Allan
  • Kerry Siminoski
  • Jerilynn C. Prior
  • Brian Lentle
  • Yvette Vigna
Article

Abstract

Background: The SF-36 is widely used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL), but with few longitudinal studies in healthy populations, it is difficult to quantify its natural history. This is important because any measure of change following an intervention may be confounded by natural changes in HRQOL. This paper assesses mean changes in SF-36 scores over a 3-year period in men and women between the ages of 40 and 59 years at baseline.

Methods: Subjects were randomly selected from nine Canadian cities. Mean SF-36 changes over a 3-year period (1996/1997-1999/2000) were calculated for each gender within 5-year age categories. Multiple imputation was used to correct for potential bias due to missing data.

Results: The baseline cohort included 1,974 women and 975 men between 40 and 59 years. Mean changes in HRQOL tended to be small. Women demonstrated small average declines in 22 of the 32 age and domain groupings (4 age groups, 8 SF-36 domains) while men showed declines in 14/32. Most participants stayed within 10 points of their original baseline score.

Interpretation: Mean SF-36 scores change only slightly over three years in middle-aged Canadians, although there is much individual variation. It may be necessary to adjust for the natural evolution of SF-36 scores when interpreting results from longitudinal studies.

Résumé

Contexte: Le SF-36 est un court questionnaire très utilisé pour évaluer la qualité de vie liée à la santé (HRQOL). Toutefois, vu le petit nombre d’études longitudinales menées auprès de populations en bonne santé, il est difficile d’évaluer l’histoire naturelle du SF-36, ce qui est important parce que tout changement noté résultant d’une intervention peut être confondu avec des changements normaux de la qualité de vie liée à la santé. Cet article évalue les changements moyens dans les scores des SF-36 sur une période de trois ans chez les hommes et les femmes qui étaient âgés de 40 à 59 ans lors de leur visite initiale.

Méthode: Les sujets ont été choisis au hasard dans neuf villes canadiennes. Les changements moyens dans les résultats du SF-36 sur une période de trois ans (1996–1997 à 1999–2000) ont été calculés par sexe et par groupe d’âge de cinq ans. L’imputation multiple a été utilisée pour corriger tout biais résultant d’informations manquantes.

Résultats: La cohorte initiale comportait 1 974 femmes et 975 hommes âgés de 40 à 59 ans. Les changements moyens étaient plutôt légers. Chez les femmes, 22 des 32 groupes d’âge et sous-échelles (quatre groupes d’âge, huit sous-échelles SF-36) présentaient de légères diminutions moyennes, alors que chez les hommes, ce nombre était de 14 groupes sur 32. Le score de la plupart des participants est demeuré en deçà de 10 points du score initial lors de l’entrée dans l’étude.

Interprétation: Les scores moyens du SF-36 ne changent que légèrement sur une période de trois ans dans la population canadienne d’âge moyen. Toutefois, il pourrait s’avérer nécessaire de tenir compte de l’évolution naturelle des scores du SF-36 lors de l’interprétation des résultats d’études longitudinales.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Reference

  1. 1.
    Ware JE Jr, Snow KK, Kosinski M, Gandek B. SF-36 Health Survey Manual and Interpretation Guide. The Health Institute, New England Medical Center, Boston, 1993.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ware JE Jr, Kosinski M, Keller SD. SF-36 Physical and Mental Summary Scales: A User’s Manual. The Health Institute, New England Medical Center, Boston, 1994.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ware JE Jr. SF-36 health survey updat. Spin. 2000;25:3130–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kaegi L. Medical Outcomes Trust Conference presents dramatic advances in patient-based outcomes assessment and potential applications in accreditation. Joint Commission Journal of Quality Improvement. 1999;25:207–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Garratt A, Schmidt L, Mackintosh A, Fitzpatrick R. Quality of life measurement: Bibliographic study of patient assessed health outcomes measure. Br Med. 2002;324:1417–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hemingway H, Stafford M, Stansfield S, Shipley M, Marmot M. Is the SF-36 a valid measure of change in population health? Results from the Whitehall II study. Br Med. 1997;315:1273–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hopman WM, Towheed T, Anastassiades T, Tenenhouse A, Poliquin S, Berger C, et al. and the CaMos Research Group. Canadian Normative Data for the SF-36 Health survey. CMA. 2000;163:265–71.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Chern JY, Wan TT, Pyles M. The stability of health status measurement (SF-36) in a working populatio. J Outcome Measure. 2000;4:461–81.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Hays RD, Marshall GN, Wang EY, Sherbourne CD. Four-year cross-lagged associations between physical and mental health in the Medical Outcomes Stud. J Consulting Clinical Psycholog. 1994;62:441–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hopman WM, Towheed T, Anastassiades T, Tenenhouse A, Poliquin S, Berger C, et al. and the CaMos Research Group. Is there regional variation in the SF-36 scores of Canadian adult. Can J Public Healt. 2002;93:233–36.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Guyatt G, Walter S, Norman G. Measuring change over time: Assessing the usefulness of evaluative instrument. J Chron Dis. 1987;40:171–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Testa MA. Interpretation of quality-of-life outcomes: Issues that affect magnitude and meaning. Med Care. 2000;38(Supplement II):166–74.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Liang MH. Longitudinal construct validity: Establishment of clinical meaning in patient evaluative instrument. Med Car. 2000;38(Supplement II):84–90.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Kreiger N, Tenenhouse A, Joseph L, MacKenzie T, Poliquin S, Brown J, et al. Research Notes: The Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos): Background, Rationale, Method. Can J Aging. 1999;18:376–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Rubin D. Multiple Imputation for Non-response in Surveys. New York: Wiley, 1987.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Kass RE, Raftery AE. Bayes factor. J Am Statistical Association. 1995;90:773–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Canadian Public Health Association 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wilma M. Hopman
    • 1
  • Claudie Berger
    • 2
  • Lawrence Joseph
    • 3
  • Tanveer Towheed
    • 4
  • Elizabeth vandenKerkhof
    • 5
  • Tassos Anastassiades
    • 6
  • Ann Cranney
    • 6
  • Jonathan D. Adachi
    • 7
  • George Ioannidis
    • 7
  • Suzette Poliquin
    • 8
  • Jacques P. Brown
    • 9
  • Timothy M. Murray
    • 10
  • David A. Hanley
    • 11
  • Emmanuel A. Papadimitropoulos
    • 12
    • 13
  • Alan Tenenhouse
    • 7
  • Suzette Poliquin
    • 14
  • Suzanne Godmaire
    • 14
  • Lawrence Joseph
    • 14
  • Claudie Berger
    • 14
  • Carol Joyce
    • 15
  • Emma Sheppard
    • 15
  • Susan Kirkland
    • 16
  • Stephanie Kaiser
    • 16
  • Barbara Stanfield
    • 16
  • Jacques P. Brown
    • 17
  • Evelyne Lejeune
    • 17
  • Tassos Anastassiades
    • 18
  • Barbara Matthews
    • 18
  • Nancy Kreiger
    • 19
  • Timothy M. Murray
    • 19
  • Barbara Gardner-Bray
    • 19
  • Jonathan D. Adachi
    • 20
  • Laura Pickard
    • 20
  • Wojciech P. Olszynski
    • 21
  • Jola Thingvold
    • 21
  • David A. Hanley
    • 22
  • Jane Allan
    • 22
  • Kerry Siminoski
    • 23
  • Jerilynn C. Prior
    • 24
  • Brian Lentle
    • 24
  • Yvette Vigna
    • 24
  1. 1.Clinical Research Centre, Kingston General Hospital and Department of Community Health and EpidemiologyQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada
  2. 2.CaMos Methods CentreMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsMcGill UniversityCanada
  4. 4.Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine; Department of Community Health and EpidemiologyQueen’s UniversityCanada
  5. 5.Department of Anesthesiology; Department of Community Health and EpidemiologyQueen’s UniversityCanada
  6. 6.Division of Rheumatology, Department of MedicineQueen’s UniversityCanada
  7. 7.Department of MedicineMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  8. 8.CaMos National Coordinating CentreMcGill UniversityCanada
  9. 9.Laval UniversitySte-FoyCanada
  10. 10.University of TorontoTorontoCanada
  11. 11.University of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  12. 12.Eli Lilly Canada IncTorontoCanada
  13. 13.Faculty of PharmacyUniversity of TorontoCanada
  14. 14.Montreal General HospitalMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  15. 15.Newfoundland and LabradorMemorial UniversitySt. John’sCanada
  16. 16.Dalhousie UniversityHalifaxCanada
  17. 17.Laval UniversityQuebec CityCanada
  18. 18.Queen’s UniversityKingstonCanada
  19. 19.University of TorontoTorontoCanada
  20. 20.McMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  21. 21.University of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  22. 22.University of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  23. 23.University of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  24. 24.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

Personalised recommendations