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Canadian Journal of Public Health

, Volume 94, Issue 1, pp 27–30 | Cite as

Smoking, Physical Activity, and Diet in North American Youth

Where Are We At?
  • Jennifer L. O’LoughlinEmail author
  • Jill Tarasuk
Commentary

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Copyright information

© The Canadian Public Health Association 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Direction de santé publique, Régie régionale de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal-CentreMcGill University Health CenterMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Joint Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Occupational HealthMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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