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Advances in Atmospheric Sciences

, Volume 18, Issue 5, pp 1005–1017 | Cite as

Relations of Water Vapor Transport from Indian Monsoon with That over East Asia and the Summer Rainfall in China

  • Zhang Renhe
Article
  • 2 Downloads

Abstract

A diagnostic study is made to investigate the relationship between water vapor transport from Indian monsoon and that over East Asia in Northern summer. It is found that water vapor transport from Indian monsoon is inverse to that over East Asia. More (less) Indian monsoon water vapor transport corresponds to less (more) water vapor transport over East Asia and less (more) rainfall in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River valley. The Indian summer monsoon water vapor transport is closely related to the intensity of the western Pacific subtropical high in its southwestern part. The stronger (weaker) the Indian summer monsoon water vapor transport, the weaker (stronger) the western Pacific subtropical high in its southwestern part, which leads to less (more) water vapor transport to East Asia, and thus less (more) rainfall in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River valley. Analysis of the out-going longwave radiation anomalies suggests that the convective heating anomalies over the Indian Ocean may have significant impact not only on the Indian monsoon, but also on the East Asian monsoon.

Key words

Water vapor transport Indian monsoon East Asian monsoon 

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Copyright information

© Advances in Atmospheric Sciences 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhang Renhe
    • 1
  1. 1.LASG, Institute of Atmospheric PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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