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Interceram - International Ceramic Review

, Volume 64, Issue 6–7, pp 282–286 | Cite as

Effect on the Microstructural and Thermomechanical Properties of a Porcelain Insulator after Substitution of Quartz by Technical Alumina

  • G. Pahari
  • T. K. Parya
High-Performance Ceramics

Abstract

The effect of substituting 0–30 mass-% quartz by technical alumina in an electrical porcelain insulator was studied. The structural and thermomechanical characteristics of siliceous porcelain were examined after industrial firing at 1260°C. A remarkable improvement was observed in the thermomechanical and microstructural qualities of well-formed electrical porcelain bodies, with the best results occurring for the composition based on 20 mass-% substitution of alumina.

Keywords

substituting quartz by technical alumina electrical porcelain insulator structural and thermomechanical characteristics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ceramic Engineering Division, Dept. of Chemical TechnologyUniversity of CalcuttaKolkataIndia

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