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Masonry Light Weight Mortars Containing Vermiculite and Rubber Crumbs of Recycled Tires

  • C. L. D. Cintra
  • A. E. M. Paiva
  • W. N. Dos Santos
  • J. B. Baldo
Building Materials
  • 1 Downloads

Abstract

The use of expanded vermiculite in traditional masonry mortar is mainly aimed at improving thermal insulating characteristics. Considering the huge environmental impact caused by discharge from used tires, the incorporation of rubber crumbs from recycled tires as aggregates in expanded-vermiculite-containing mortars can be seen as a way to combine thermal insulation with sustainability. In this work, the physical, mechanical, and thermal conductivity properties of several masonry mortars containing expanded vermiculite combined with recycled rubber aggregates from used tires, were investigated. The properties of the mortars containing rubber plus vermiculite were evaluated comparatively to those of vermiculite without rubber and also to one traditional mortar containing sand:lime:cement and to an industrialized mortar. The results indicated that compared to the traditional and industrialized masonry mortars, the mortars containing rubber plus vermiculite presented the required standard compressive strength, up to 75% less thermal conductivity, 50% less bulk density, and a covering yield at least twice that of traditional and industrialized mortars, while maintaining similar properties to those of vermiculite containing light weight mortars.

Keywords

expanded vermiculite recycled rubber tires rubber crumbs mortar 

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. L. D. Cintra
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. E. M. Paiva
    • 2
  • W. N. Dos Santos
    • 3
  • J. B. Baldo
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Building ConstructionFederal Institute of MaranhãoSão LuisBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Mechanics and MaterialsFederal Institute of MaranhãoSão LuisBrazil
  3. 3.Department of Materials EngineeringUniversity Federal de São CarlosSão CarlosBrazil

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