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Exploring adventure therapy as an early intervention for struggling adolescents

  • Will DobudEmail author
Refereed Article
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Abstract

This paper presents an account of a research project that explored the experiences of adolescents struggling with behavioural and emotional issues, who participated in a 14-day adventure therapy program in Australia referred to by the pseudonym, “Onward Adventures.” All participants of this program over the age of 16 who completed within the last two years were asked to complete a survey. Additionally, the parents of these participants were invited to complete a similar survey. The qualitative surveys were designed to question participants’ and parents’ perceptions of the program (pre- and post-), the relationships (therapeutic alliance) built with program therapists, follow-up support, and outcomes of the program. Both participants and parents reported strong relationships with program leaders, stressed the importance of effective follow-up services, and perceived positive outcomes when it came to self-esteem and social skills, seeing comparable improvement in self-concept, overall behaviour, and coping skills.

Keywords

adventure therapy adolescence family systems interventions 

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Copyright information

© Outdoor Education Australia 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Charles Sturt UniversityAustralia

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