Advertisement

Wilderness-Adventure Therapy In Adolescent Mental Health

  • Simon Crisp
  • Matthew O’Donnell
Refereed Article
  • 5 Downloads

Abstract

Wilderness-adventure therapy has gained increasing interest in Australia in recent years. It has been found to be of particular use for addressing core mental health problems of adolescents at risk of adult mental health problems and suicide. However, there are few, if any models which make a clear theoretical rationale for HOW wilderness-adventure therapy interventions should be made and which relate to models explaining the etiology of mental health problems. In order to answer the question “what intervention for which client?” a thorough developmental understanding needs to be made. An eclectic model of wilderness-adventure therapy intervention is outlined based on a comprehensive developmental understanding. The Brief Intervention Program and case studies are presented to illustrate this approach.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 4th Edition: DSM-IV, American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  2. Crisp, S. (1996). When does wilderness adventure become therapeutic? The need for broader frameworks: Experiential reconstruction of developmental foundations. Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, 2, (1), 9–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Davis-Berman, J. & Berman, D. (1994). Wilderness Therapy: Foundations, Theory & Research. Kendall/Hunt Publishing, Iowa, USA.Google Scholar
  4. Kimball, R. (1993). The use of wilderness as an assessment tool, Cited in Gass, M. (Ed). (1993) Adventure Therapy — Therapeutic Applications of Adventure Programming, Kendall/Hunt Publishing, Iowa, USA.Google Scholar
  5. Kingston, L., Poot, A. & Thomas, N. (1997). Brief intervention Program under the Microscope: An Evaluation of the Brief Intervention Program, Child & Adolescent Mental Health Service, Austin & Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne, Australia.Google Scholar
  6. Lidz, T. (1983). The Person: His and her development throughout the life cycle, Basic Books, Inc. New York.Google Scholar
  7. Mitten, D. (1994). Ethical considerations in adventure therapy: A feminist critique. In Cole. E., Erdman, E. & Rothblum, E.D. (Ed.s)(1995). Wilderness Therapy for Women — The Power of Adventure. Harrington Park Press, New York.Google Scholar
  8. Nurcombe, B. (1987). Diagnostic reasoning and treatment planning: II. Treatment, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 21, 483–489.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Nurcombe, B. & Fitzhenry-Coor, I. (1987). Diagnostic reasoning and treatment planning: I. Diagnosis, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 21, 477–499.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Laplanche, J & Pontalis, J.B. (1988). The Language of Psychoanalysis, Karnac Books & the Institute of Psychoanalysis, London.Google Scholar
  11. Tippet, S. (1993). Therapeutic wilderness programming for borderline adolescents. In Gass, M. (Ed) (1993) Adventure Therapy — Therapeutic Applications of Adventure Programming. Kendall/Hunt Publishing, Iowa, USA.Google Scholar
  12. Victorian State Government (1997). Suicide Prevention: Victorian Task Force Report, Department of Human Services, Government Printer, Melbourne, Australia.Google Scholar
  13. Yalom, I. (1985). The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy, 3rd Ed. New York, Basic Books.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Outdoor Education Australia 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Crisp
    • 1
  • Matthew O’Donnell
    • 1
  1. 1.Austin & Repatriation Medical CentreMelbourneAustralia

Personalised recommendations