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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 9–13 | Cite as

Skinner’s Verbal Behavior: A Reference List

  • Mark L. Sundberg
  • James W. Partington
Article

Abstract

The language literature contains many citations to Skinner’s book Verbal Behavior (1957), however, most of them are negative and generally unsupportive. The current list of references was assembled to bring readers in contact with the growing body of literature which supports Skinner’s work. A total of 136 references were found and divided into two categories, (1) conceptual, and (2) experimental and applied. These references are presented in an effort to stimulate additional research in this important aspect of behavior analysis.

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark L. Sundberg
    • 1
  • James W. Partington
    • 1
  1. 1.Regional Center of the East BayOaklandUSA

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