Advertisement

Historical Archaeology

, Volume 47, Issue 4, pp 71–85 | Cite as

A Taphonomic Evaluation of Three Intact Pork Barrels from the Steamboat Heroine (1838)

  • Juliet K. Brophy
  • Kevin Crisman
Article

Abstract

This study focuses on three pork barrels from the cargo of the Heroine, a steamboat that wrecked on the Red River in 1838 while carrying provisions to the U.S. Army garrison at Fort Towson, Oklahoma. The quantity and quality of the meat, as evidenced by the bones in the barrels, are examined to establish whether the meat matched the military contract, to ascertain the pork butchery and packaging procedures, and to determine any standardization in the types and quantities of pieces in the barrels. The results suggest that the meat represents a midgrade pork and generally agree with the quality expected by the military. Analyses reveal that processing was similar to modern-day practices. Finally, a comparison of the bones illustrates a lack of standardization among the barrels. This research provides important information about pig processing and military-contract compliance, two areas that have not been extensively studied previously.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Billings, John D. 1960 Hardtack and Coffee, the Unwritten Story of Army Life. R. R. Donnelly & Sons, Chicago, IL.Google Scholar
  2. Cist, Charles 1846 The Cincinnati Miscellany, or, Antiquities of the West. Robinson and Jones, Cincinnati, OH.Google Scholar
  3. Commissary General 1838 Niswanger & Sullivant Fort Towson 1838. Contract for Army Subsistence, Record Group 192, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, MD.Google Scholar
  4. Crisman, Kevin 2005 The Heroine of the Red River. INA Quarterly 32(2):3–10.Google Scholar
  5. Davis, William C. 2003 A Taste for War: The Culinary History of the Blue and Gray. Stackpole, Mechanicsburg, PA.Google Scholar
  6. English, A. J. 1990 Salted Meats from the Wreck of the William Salthouse: Archaeological Analysis of Nineteenth Century Butchering Patterns. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 8:63–69.Google Scholar
  7. Hasheider, Philip 2010 The Complete Book of Butchering, Smoking, Curing, and Sausage Making: How to Harvest Your Livestock and Wild Game. Voyageur Press, Minneapolis, MN.Google Scholar
  8. Homenuck, Henry Peter Michael 1965 Historical Geography of the Cincinnati Pork Industry: 1810-1883. Master’s thesis, Department of Geography, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.Google Scholar
  9. Lees, William B., and Barto Arnold 2000 Preliminary Assessment of a Wreck in the Red River, Choctaw County, Oklahoma, USA. International Journal of Nautical Archaeology 29(1):120–125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. LOUISIANA DAILY PUBLIC ADVOCATE 1830 Directions Providing for the Inspection of Beef and Pork in the City of New Orleans. Louisiana Daily Public Advocate 30 January. New Orleans.Google Scholar
  11. Lucas, Gregory S. 2005 Zooarchaeological Analysis of the Contents of the Heroine Pork Barrel. Manuscript, Georgia Museum of Natural History, Athens.Google Scholar
  12. Matschke, George H. 1967 Aging European Wild Hogs by Dentition. Journal of Wildlife Management 31(1):109–113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Mayhew, Anthony L. 1912 On Some Etymologies of English Words. Modern Language Review 7(3):318–325.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Mescher, Virginia 2005 The Ubiquitous Pork Barrel. Association for Living History, Farm and Agricultural Museums (ALHFAM) Bulletin 34(4):13–17Google Scholar
  15. Niswanger, Christopher 1838a Letter to U.S. Army Commissary General George Gibson, 28 April. Record Group 192, Entry 10, Box 46, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, MD.Google Scholar
  16. 1838b Letter to U.S. Army Commissary General George Gibson, 14 June. Record Group 192, Entry 10, Box 46, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, MD.Google Scholar
  17. Ockerman, Herbert W., AND CONLY L. HANSEN 1999 Animal By-Product Processing and Utilization. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.Google Scholar
  18. Pennsylvania Reporter 1837 Separate Proposals Will Be Received. Pennsylvania Reporter 4 August. Harrisburg.Google Scholar
  19. Savell, Jeffrey Wyatt 2000 Laboratory Manual for Meat Science, 7th edition. American Press, Boston MA.Google Scholar
  20. Trollope, Frances 1949 Domestic Manners of the Americans. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  21. Vose, Josiah H. 1838a Letter to U.S. Army Commissary General George Gibson, 21 April. Record Group 92, Entry 225, Box 1145, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  22. 1838b Letter to U.S. Army Commissary General George Gibson, 14 May. Record Group 92, Entry 225, Box 1145, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  23. Wade, Louise C. 2003 Chicago’s Pride: The Stockyards, Packingtown, and Environs in the Nineteenth Century. University of Illinois Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  24. Wilson, John P., and Linda D. Southwood 1976 Fort George on the Niagara: An Archaeological Perspective. Parks Canada, History and Archaeology 9. Ottawa, ON.Google Scholar
  25. Woodruff, J. H. 1836 The Cincinnati Directory for the Years 1836–7. J. H. Woodruff, Cincinnati, OH.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Society for Historical Archaeology 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juliet K. Brophy
    • 1
  • Kevin Crisman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyLoyola University ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

Personalised recommendations