Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 323–327 | Cite as

Effects of whole-body vibration exercise on the endocrine system of healthy men

  • C. Di Loreto
  • A. Ranchelli
  • P. Lucidi
  • G. Murdolo
  • N. Parlanti
  • A. De Cicco
  • O. Tsarpela
  • G. Annino
  • C. Bosco
  • F. Santeusanio
  • G. B. Bolli
  • P. De Feo
Original Article

Abstract

Whole-body vibration is reported to increase muscle performance, bone mineral density and stimulate the secretion of lipolytic and protein anabolic hormones, such as GH and testosterone, that might be used for the treatment of obesity. To date, as no controlled trial has examined the effects of vibration exercise on the human endocrine system, we performed a randomized controlled study, to establish whether the circulating concentrations of glucose and hormones (insulin, glucagon, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, GH, IGF-1, free and total testosterone) are affected by vibration in 10 healthy men [age 39±3, body mass index (BMI) of 23.5±0.5 kg/m2, mean±SEM]. Volunteers were studied on two occasions before and after standing for 25 min on a ground plate in the absence (control) or in the presence (vibration) of 30 Hz whole body vibration. Vibration slightly reduced plasma glucose (30 min: vibration 4.59±0.21, control 4.74±0.22 mM, p=0.049) and increased plasma norepinephrine concentrations (60 min: vibration 1.29±0.18, control 1.01±0.07 nM, p=0.038), but did not change the circulating concentrations of other hormones. These results demonstrate that vibration exercise transiently reduces plasma glucose, possibly by increasing glucose utilization by contracting muscles. Since hormonal responses, with the exception of norepinephrine, are not affected by acute vibration exposure, this type of exercise is not expected to reduce fat mass in obese subjects.

Key-words

Hormones exercise physiology muscle contraction training glucose 

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Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Di Loreto
    • 1
  • A. Ranchelli
    • 1
  • P. Lucidi
    • 1
  • G. Murdolo
    • 1
  • N. Parlanti
    • 1
  • A. De Cicco
    • 1
  • O. Tsarpela
    • 2
  • G. Annino
    • 2
  • C. Bosco
    • 2
  • F. Santeusanio
    • 1
  • G. B. Bolli
    • 1
  • P. De Feo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Internal Medicine and Endocrine and Metabolic Sciences (I.M.I.S.E.M.)University of PerugiaPerugiaItaly
  2. 2.Faculty of Medicine and SurgeryUniversity of Rome Tor VergataRomeItaly

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