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Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 34, Issue 5, pp e110–e114 | Cite as

Fasting and post-prandial adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase in obesity and Type 2 diabetes

  • G. Costabile
  • G. Annuzzi
  • L. Di Marino
  • C. De Natale
  • R. Giacco
  • L. Bozzetto
  • P. Cipriano
  • C. Santangelo
  • R. Masella
  • A. A. Rivellese
Article

Abstract

Background: Fasting and post-prandial abnormalities of adipose tissue (AT) lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activities may have pathophysiological relevance in insulin-resistant conditions. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate activity and gene expression of AT LPL and HSL at fasting and 6 h after meal in two insulin-resistant groups — obese with Type 2 diabetes and obese without diabetes — and in non-diabetic normal-weight controls. Material/subjects and methods: Nine obese subjects with diabetes, 10 with obesity alone, and 9 controls underwent measurements of plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and triglycerides before and after a standard fat-rich meal. Fasting and post-prandial (6 h) LPL and HSL activities and gene expressions were determined in abdominal subcutaneous AT needle biopsies. Results: The diabetic obese subjects had significantly lower fasting and post-prandial AT heparin-releasable LPL activity than only obese and control subjects (p<0.05) as well as lower mRNA LPL levels. HSL activity was significantly reduced in the 2 groups of obese subjects compared to controls in both fasting condition and 6 h after the meal (p<0.05), while HSL mRNA levels were not different. There were no significant changes between fasting and 6 h after meal measurements in either LPL or HSL activities and gene expressions. Conclusions: Lipolytic activities in AT are differently altered in obesity and Type 2 diabetes being HSL alteration associated with both insulin-resistant conditions and LPL with diabetes per se. These abnormalities are similarly observed in the fasting condition and after a fat-rich meal.

Key-words

Adipose tissue hormone-sensitive lipase insulin resistance lipoprotein lipase obesity 

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Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Costabile
    • 1
  • G. Annuzzi
    • 1
  • L. Di Marino
    • 1
  • C. De Natale
    • 1
  • R. Giacco
    • 2
  • L. Bozzetto
    • 1
  • P. Cipriano
    • 1
  • C. Santangelo
    • 3
  • R. Masella
    • 3
  • A. A. Rivellese
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineFederico II UniversityNapoliItaly
  2. 2.Institute of Food Science and TechnologyCNRAvellino
  3. 3.National Centre for Food Quality and Risk AssessmentNational Institute of HealthRomeItaly

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