Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 36, Issue 8, pp 648–653 | Cite as

Glucose intolerance states in women with the polycystic ovary syndrome

Review Article

Abstract

The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common hyperandrogenic disorder affecting 4–7% of women, is often associated with metabolic alterations, chiefly insulin resistance and obesity. Based on available scientific evidence, PCOS should be regarded as an independent risk for the development of glucose intolerance states. This short review summarizes the available literature on the prevalence and incidence of impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes in this disorder. In addition, some insights on potential factors responsible for individual susceptibility are discussed. Targeted intervention studies focused on prevention and treatment of glucose intolerance states in PCOS are warranted.

Key-words

Insulin resistance insulin secretion obesity polycystic ovary syndrome Type 2 diabetes 

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Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences (DIMEC), S. Orsola-Malpighi HospitalUniversity Alma Mater StudiorumBolognaItaly

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