Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 411–414 | Cite as

Variations of retinol binding protein 4 levels are not associated with changes in insulin resistance during puberty

  • N. Santoro
  • L. Perrone
  • G. Cirillo
  • C. Brienza
  • A. Grandone
  • N. Cresta
  • E. Miraglia del Giudice
Original Articles

Abstract

Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) is an adipokine involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in obese adults and children. Since insulin resistance occurs during puberty, independently of adiposity, a role for RBP4 in the onset of this phenomenon may be hypothesized. In order to verify our hypothesis, we studied 90 subjects (45 obese and 45 lean controls). A complete physical examination was assessed, the z-score body mass index (BMI) was calculated, fat mass was assessed by bioelectric impedance analysis, and pubertal stage was assessed according to Tanner. Serum insulin and serum RBP4 levels were assayed. Obese and lean children differed for z-score BMI, fat mass, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and RBP4 levels. z-score BMI and HOMA-IR showed a direct correlation with RBP4 in the total population. When the subjects were divided in lean and obese, this correlation was evident only in obese (r2: 0.2; p=0.009 and r2: 0.2; p=0.01), but not in lean subjects (r2: 0.09; p=0.1 and r2: 0.03; p=0.4). Both in obese and lean HOMA-IR values were higher in pubertal subjects than in pre-pubertal (p<0.001), while serum RBP4 levels were similar in pubertal and in pre-pubertal subjects (>0.1). We conclude that RBP4 is correlated with adiposity and insulin resistance in obese children, but it is not involved in the insulin resistance occurring during puberty.

Key-words

Children insulin resistance puberty RBP4 

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Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Santoro
    • 1
  • L. Perrone
    • 1
  • G. Cirillo
    • 1
  • C. Brienza
    • 1
  • A. Grandone
    • 1
  • N. Cresta
    • 1
  • E. Miraglia del Giudice
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Pediatria “F. Fede”Seconda Università di NapoliNapoliItaly

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