Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 32, Issue 4, pp 370–382 | Cite as

Endothelial progenitor cells and their potential clinical implication in cardiovascular disorders

Review Article

Abstract

Risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases reduce the availability of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) by affecting their mobilization and integration into injured vascular sites. The existence of a bone marrow reservoir of EPC has attracted interest, especially as target for therapeutic intervention in different pathological settings. Among the cardiovascular risk factors, hypertension has been shown to be a strongest predictor of EPC migratory impairment. However, at present, data concerning EPC biology are still limited. In this article we provide an overview of data relevant to their potential clinical implications in cardiovascular disorders. In addition, the recent advances in understanding the role of EPC in the pathophysiology of hypertension are discussed.

Key-words

Cardiovascular diseases diabetes endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) reendothelialization transplantation 

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Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of TorinoTorinoItaly

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