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Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 26–31 | Cite as

The Role and Function of Residents’ Organizations in Psychiatry Education

  • James Lock
  • Brian Kleis
  • Thomas Strouse
  • Sandra Jacobson
  • Joel Yager
  • Mark Servis
Regular Article
  • 4 Downloads

Abstract

Psychiatry residents’ organizations have been poorly studied and variously portrayed as facilitative or regressive. A telephone survey of 19 residency programs of differing sizes in all major geographic regions revealed that 89% had some form of residents’ organization. The groups are characterized by a wide range of structures, and they undertake a variety of tasks. The most common tasks are support, problem solving, and venting dissatisfaction. Problems frequently faced by such groups include changing resident constituencies, personality conflicts, authorization disputes, and representation and consensus problems. Strengths of such groups include their ability to help foster a sense of group identity; to provide a safe place to ventilate, work on problems, and fashion a consensus for the residents’ input to the institution; and to offer training opportunities f or future psychiatric managers.

Keywords

Residency Program Dispute Resolution Department Chair Chief Resident House Staff 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Lock
    • 1
  • Brian Kleis
    • 2
  • Thomas Strouse
    • 1
  • Sandra Jacobson
    • 1
  • Joel Yager
    • 1
  • Mark Servis
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Science, School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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