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Estimation of number of deaths associated with exposure to excess ambient PM10 air pollution

  • D. Giri
  • V. K. Murthy
  • P. R. Adhikary
  • S. N. Khanal
Article

Abstract

The respirable particle matter (PM10) concentration in urban areas has been a chronic cause concern and principal reason for increased morbidity rate among resident population. The present study aimed at estimating a discrete event like mortality rate associated and attributable to excess particulate matter pollution in the Kathmandu Valley area. The Government of Nepal conducts air monitoring of particulates at its air monitoring site network covering valley area. Adopting the data available with respect to PM10 and with several other considerations like cutoff value for PM10, mean annual concentration, demographic data of valley, exceedance to the reference cutoff value, attributable fraction evolution and computation relative risk attributable to PM10 was computed. Assumption was made about the relative risk of long-term average PM10 exposure on natural mortality estimated and reported from a previous study. The estimation or mortality rate in our case was 0.95% after all these considerations and computation. This implies that 95 deaths out of 10,000 deaths are due to particulate pollution existing in the Kathmandu Valley Area.

Keywords

Air pollution PM10 mortality valley Kathmandu 

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Copyright information

© Islamic Azad University 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Giri
    • 1
  • V. K. Murthy
    • 1
  • P. R. Adhikary
    • 1
  • S. N. Khanal
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mathematical SciencesKathmandu UniversityKavreNepal

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