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Reactive Oxygen Species and Antioxidants in Plants: An Overview

  • Varindra Pandhair
  • B. S. SekhonEmail author
Mini Review

Abstract

Plants exposed to biotic and abiotic stresses generate more reactive oxygen species (ROS) than their capacity to scavenge them. Biological molecules are susceptible to attack by ROS, including several proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids and nucleic acids. The cellular arsenal for scavenging ROS and toxic organic radicals include ascorbate, glutathione, tocopherol, carotenoids, polyphenols, alkaloids and other compounds. Enzymatic antioxidants including superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase detoxify either by quenching toxic compounds or regenerating antioxidants involving reducing power. Various aspects relating to sensors for ROS and signaling role of ROS in plants, improvement of antioxidant systems in transgenic plants and functional genomics approaches used to unravel the reactive oxygen gene network has been discussed.

Key words

plants reactive oxygen species antioxidants enzymes genomics 

Abbreviations

ROS

reactive oxygen species

ABA

abscisic acid

CAT

catalase

Car

carotenoid

POD

peroxidase

SOD

superoxide dismutase

GSH

glutathione (reduced)

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and ChemistryPunjab Agricultural UniversityLudhianaIndia

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