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European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 166–174 | Cite as

Behaviour Management Techniques in Paediatric Dentistry

  • J. F. RobertsEmail author
  • M. E. J. Curzon
  • G. Koch
  • L. C. Martens
Review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Behaviour management is widely agreed to be a key factor in providing dental care for children. Indeed, if a child’s behaviour in the dental surgery/office cannot be managed then it is difficult if not impossible to carry out any dental care that is needed. It is imperative that any approach to behavioural management for the dental child patient must be rooted in empathy and a concern for the well being of each child. REVIEW: Based on various presentations given at Congresses of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD), documents reviewing behaviour management prepared by the Clinical Affairs Committee of the EAPD, and written submissions to the Executive Board of the EAPD, a review of the various approaches to the behaviour management of the child dental patient was completed. All aspects of non-pharmacological behavioural management techniques described in the literature over the past 80 years were reviewed. FINDINGS: There is a very wide diversity of techniques used but not all are universally accepted by specialist paediatric and general dentists. Wide cultural and philosophical differences are apparent among European paediatric dentists that seem difficult to bridge when forming agreed guidelines. Accordingly, this review highlights those behaviour techniques that are universally accepted such as tell, show, do (TSD) or positive reinforcement, but nevertheless describes the most commonly mentioned techniques for which there are descriptions in the literature. CONCLUSION: A wide variety of behavioural management techniques are available to paediatric dentists which must be used as appropriate for the benefit of each child patient, and which, importantly, must take into account all cultural, philosophical and legal requirements in the country of dental practice of every dentist concerned with dental care of children.

Key words

behaviour management paediatric dentistry children 

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Copyright information

© Adis International 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. F. Roberts
    • 1
    Email author
  • M. E. J. Curzon
    • 2
  • G. Koch
    • 3
  • L. C. Martens
    • 4
  1. 1.LondonEngland
  2. 2.Paediatric DentistryUniversity of LeedsLeedsEngland
  3. 3.Paediatric DentistryInstitute for Postgraduate DentistryJonkopingSweden
  4. 4.Paediatric DentistryUniversity of GhentBelgium

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